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Snow Camp in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Micajah McPherson

We have Fought the Good Fight and Kept Our Faith

 
 
Micajah McPherson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley
1. Micajah McPherson Marker
Inscription. Micajah McPherson, a trustee of Freedom Hill Wesleyan Methodist Church and abolitionist, was lynched about a mile and a half southeast of here. Although there are different stories about his lynching, they agree that he was an innocent man lynched by vigilantes who the authorities protected.

According to his descendants, after the Confederate conscription act was passed in 1862, riders approached McPherson’s house one day and demanded, “Where’s your boy?” “The Hunters”— the Chatham County sheriff’s men, Home Guards, and McPherson relatives seeking conscripts— were looking for McPherson’s service-age son, Tommy, who was in hiding. The two had worked out a plan to keep the boy fed, and his father from lying. When young McPherson returned an empty food basket to the house for refilling, he left a note inside that said where to deliver the full basket. His father then could say truthfully that he did not know where his son was.

Dissatisfied with McPherson’s denials, the Hunters dragged him to a split-rail fence, forced his hands into the narrow space between two rails, and then jumped up and down on the upper rail. When his answer did not change, they hauled him into the woods, fired a shot at his house to intimidate his family, and hanged him from a large dogwood tree by the creek.

Micajah McPherson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
2. Micajah McPherson Marker
McPherson survived the hanging, however, saying later that a noise startled the Hunters, who fled. He heard one of them say, “I do not believe the old SOB is dead yet.” Years later at a church service, according to tradition, McPherson approached a stranger to the church and told him, “You are one of those that hanged me.” The stranger left and never returned.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 53.127′ N, 79° 26.099′ W. Marker is in Snow Camp, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is on Drama Road. Touch for map. Located in the parking lot of the Snow Camp Outdoor Theater. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 Drama Road, Snow Camp NC 27349, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Freedom Hill Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Cane Creek Meeting House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Snow Camp (approx. half a mile away); Cane Creek Meeting (approx. 0.6 miles away); Cane Creek Friends Meeting Since 1751 / Abigail Overman Pike 1709 - 1781
from Harper’s Weekly, Dec. 24, 1864 image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
3. from Harper’s Weekly, Dec. 24, 1864
(approx. 0.7 miles away); A Memorial to British Troops Who Died in the Old Meeting House (approx. 0.7 miles away); Allen House (approx. 1.2 miles away); Early Railroads (approx. 4.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Snow Camp.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Micajah McPherson and his wife, Phebe McPherson image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
4. Micajah McPherson and his wife, Phebe McPherson
You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
5. You Are Here
Snow Camp Outdoor Theater parking lot. image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
6. Snow Camp Outdoor Theater parking lot.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2011, by Dave Twamley of Durham, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 799 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 12, 2011, by Dave Twamley of Durham, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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