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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mahaning Heights in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Mahan

Civil War Defenses of Washington

 
 
Fort Mahan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2011
1. Fort Mahan Marker
Inscription.
Fort Mahan
Civil War Defenses of Washington
1861-1865

Earthworks of Fort Mahan are visible; follow path at the top of the hill.

[Illustration:]
Fort Mahan from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing.

- Fort Mahan was named after West Point professor Dennis Hart Mahan whose book on fortifications guided construction of the forts around Washington, D.C.

[Map of the District of Columbia showing ...:]
Other Civil War fort locations administered by the National Park Service.

[Generic series photograph of Fort Circle artillerymen and cannon on a hilltop overlooking rural D.C.:]
During the Civil War, Washington’s forts overlooked farm land.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.617′ N, 76° 56.655′ W. Marker is in Mahaning Heights, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Benning Road, NE west of 14th Street, NE. Touch for map. Marker is above the lawn on the hillside hiker trail, south side of Fort Mahan Park, north of Benning Road. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4000 Benning Rd, NE, Washington DC 20019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Fort Mahan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2011
2. Fort Mahan Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Chaplin (approx. half a mile away); “What Magic Has Been Wrought Here” (approx. 0.6 miles away); Designed to Compete (approx. 0.7 miles away); Woodlawn Cemetery (approx. 0.7 miles away); A Whirl on the Ferris Wheel (approx. 0.8 miles away); National Training School for Women and Girls/ Nannie Helen Burroughs (approx. 0.8 miles away); With These Hands (approx. 0.9 miles away); Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 9 (approx. 1.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Mahan - Civil War Defenses of Washington. Fort Mahan, situated on an isolated hill belonging to Dr. William Manning, was built to guard the approaches to Benning's Bridge which crosses the Anacostia River. (Submitted on August 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Dennis Hart Mahan. ... He resigned his commission in 1832 to accept the position of Chair of the Engineering Department [USMA]. ... An important influence on the military conduct of the American Civil War and Civil Engineering, Mahan is best understood as an educator and technology transfer agent, not a theorist. Mahan almost singlehandedly compiled and transferred the best of European engineering to the United States and other English-speaking parts of the world. Virtually all 19th century American engineering schools were started with West
Thick forest landscape along the Fort Mahan hiker trail image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2011
3. Thick forest landscape along the Fort Mahan hiker trail
Point-educated faculty or adopted its texts. ... (Submitted on August 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Fort Circle Parks; Mahaning Heights; Irish-Americans
 
Categories. EducationForts, CastlesNotable PersonsWar, US Civil
 
Overgrown Civil War earthworks off the Fort Mahan trail image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2011
4. Overgrown Civil War earthworks off the Fort Mahan trail
Fort Mahan Park hiking trail - view downhill toward the Fort Mahan marker and Benning Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2011
5. Fort Mahan Park hiking trail - view downhill toward the Fort Mahan marker and Benning Rd.
Directional marker off 14th Street image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2011
6. Directional marker off 14th Street
The fort was named after Dennis Hart Mahan who was an American soldier and an educator. He taught civil and military engineering at the Military Academy.
Go experience the history yourself.
Imagine what Fort Mahan and the Fort Circle Parks could look like in the future!
Maintain the history, Keep the park and neighborhood clean as possible…
Prof. Dennis Harte Mahan image. Click for full size.
By U.S. Militrary Academy
7. Prof. Dennis Harte Mahan
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 779 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 13, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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