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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Robert Brewton House

Private Residence

 
 
Robert Brewton House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
1. Robert Brewton House Marker
Inscription.
Built circa 1720 for
Colonel Robert Brewton
wealthy wharf owner and
provincial powder receiver.
One of the earliest fine
examples of a
single house.
[Plaque]
Robert Brewton House

Has Been Designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark


under the provisions of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1955
this site possesses exceptional value
in commemorating and illustrating
the history of the United States
1962

 
Erected 1962 by Preservation Society of Charleston (Upper); United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service (Lower).
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks, and the South Carolina, Preservation Society of Charleston marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.467′ N, 79° 55.733′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Church Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 71 Church Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dr. Thomas Dale House (here, next to this marker); 73 Church Street
Robert Brewton House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
2. Robert Brewton House and Marker
Due to the trees, it is difficult to photograph the house. The links include photos taken when the trees were cut back.
(here, next to this marker); Capers Motte House (a few steps from this marker); DuBose Heyward House (a few steps from this marker); John McCall House (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Rose's House (within shouting distance of this marker); First Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); 83-85 Church Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 26 Tradd Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 23 Tradd Street (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Robert Brewton House. The Robert Brewton House is the earliest accurately dated example of an architectural type known in Charleston as the “single house,” built in 1730. (Submitted on September 26, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Colonel Robert Brewton House. Dating from circa 1720, this outstanding residence is distinguished as Charleston's oldest existing "single house," built for Col. Robert
Robert Brewton House image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
3. Robert Brewton House
Has Been Designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark


under the provisions of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1955
this site possesses exceptional value
in commemorating and illustrating
the history of the United States
1962
Brewton, a wealthy wharf owner, militia officer, and member of the Commons House of Assembly. (Submitted on September 26, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. National Register of Historic Places:
The Robert Brewton House is the earliest accurately dated example of an architectural type known in Charleston as the “single house,” built in 1730. Standing three-stories high, the house has its narrow side to the street, its entrance at the side, is just one room wide across the street front and just one room to either side of the hall on all three floors, has no basement below ground, and extends into a long narrow garden at the rear, containing kitchen,carriage house, and servants quarters. At the exterior of the house we should notice the low basement,with crawl space entrance at the street front, the French doors from the drawing room at the second story, the scaling of the façade through smaller third story windows, and the spars detailing of stucco, pretty much limited to a keystone-like element over each window and the quoining of the corners. The iron-grilled balcony of the drawing room is a later addition, as well as the three-story porch tucked into the corner formed by the rear end of the
Robert Brewton House Marker and entrance image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
4. Robert Brewton House Marker and entrance
side and the kitchen. A carved flat door lintel and a cornice with small consoles are the two chief carved ornaments at the exterior. The interior contains interesting and skilled carved mantelpieces, some from a later period, and Georgian chair rails, wainscoting, and cornices. While the Robert Brewton House then, which is without a piazza, may at first appear to be lacking an important single-house element, its early date argues that it represents a “pre-piazza” phase of building. The house did acquire side wooden porches, first one story, and
then two, but they are no longer in place. Listed in the National Register October 15, 1966; Designated a National Historic Landmark October 9, 1960. (South Carolina Department of Archives and History)


National Register of Historic Places:
Brewton, Robert, House *** (added 1966 - - #66000700)
♦ Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering
♦ Area of Significance: Architecture
♦ Period of Significance: 1700-1749
♦ Historic Function: Domestic
♦ Current Function: Domestic
    — Submitted December 26, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 26, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 493 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 26, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on December 26, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on December 17, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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