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Cave Spring in Floyd County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Georgia School for the Deaf

 
 
Georgia School for the Deaf Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
1. Georgia School for the Deaf Marker
Inscription. In 1833, a deaf man, John Jacobus Flournoy, of Jackson County, great grandson of Jacob Flournoy, a French Huguenot, urging education for the deaf, interested Governor Wilson Lumpkin and the Georgia Legislature in the educational movement. At first the pupils, few in number, were sent to the American Asylum for Deaf and Dumb in Hartford, Conn. Distance, weather and the youth of the pupils made that unsatisfactory. On May 15, 1846, with four pupils in a log cabin, with O.P. Fannin, teacher, this school began as a part of the Hearn Manual School at Cave Spring, Georgia. This school grew rapidly and, in 1847, a brick building was erected and dedicated. Later, other additions were made. The school was closed during the War Between the States and used as a hospital by both Confederate and Union forces. It resumed operations in February 1867 and is still supported by the State of Georgia. In 1955 this school had 82 teachers and employees and an income of more than $500,000.
 
Erected 1956. (Marker Number 057-11.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 6.446′ N, 85° 20.045′ W. Marker is in Cave Spring, Georgia, in Floyd
Georgia School for the Deaf Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
2. Georgia School for the Deaf Marker
County. Marker is at the intersection of School Circle and Alabama Street, on the right when traveling north on School Circle. Touch for map. The marker is in front of the old school building, now the Cave Spring City Hall, in Rolator Park. Marker is in this post office area: Cave Spring GA 30124, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Big Spring Park (approx. 7.8 miles away); Ivy Ledbetter Lee (approx. 7.9 miles away); Polk County (approx. 7.9 miles away); Sterling Holloway (approx. 8 miles away); Medora Field Perkerson (approx. 10.8 miles away); Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery (approx. 11.2 miles away); General Thomas Edwin Greenfield Ransom 1834-1864 (approx. 11.6 miles away); Georgia’s Paul Revere (approx. 13.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  The Georgia School for the Deaf. The school has moved to a larger campus in the Came Spring area. (Submitted on October 7, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Rebuild of number #6
I was there when we started rebuilding the school. It was in terrible shape, roof was collapsing, siding was peeling off the doors and windows were rotting many were unusable and broken and there was a terrible
Georgia School for the Deaf Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
3. Georgia School for the Deaf Marker
honey bee infestation. As I was saying I was a young guy then and we replaced rebuilt the roof and started working our way down doing siding and re glazing windows, replacing broken glass, Rebuilding the window frames basically sealing the building against the elements. Then we started on the lower floor first thing was the front doors all rotten and unusable. I told our boss that I could make new doors, he told me we could only use what was taken from the rebuild or scraps to make them with so I grabbed some of the old rafters and with basic hand tools built a set of door.s. Looking at the photo I see after all these years my doors still stand. We never completed the project because of funding but at least I know when a visitor walks in they walk through my doors. I enjoyed being a part of it and I hope it stands forever. By the way great job looks wonderful compared to the old collapsing building we started with. After this I worked at Oneil Manufacturing for over a decade as a wood wright retired now.
    — Submitted January 29, 2015, by Toby Jay Faircloth of Fayetteville, North Carolina.

 
Categories. EducationWar, US Civil
 
Georgia School for the Deaf Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
4. Georgia School for the Deaf Marker
The original brick school building is in the background.
Georgia School for the Deaf image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
5. Georgia School for the Deaf
The original building, built in 1847 and named Fannin Hall, is now the Cave Spring City Hall. It has been extensively modified from its original appearance.
Georgia School for the Deaf image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
6. Georgia School for the Deaf
This building was built c.1910 as additional classroom space for the school.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 5, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 958 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 5, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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