Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Saugus in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Iron Works

1630-1930

 
 
Iron Works Marker image. Click for full size.
By Russell C. Bixby, October 9, 2011
1. Iron Works Marker
Marker was previously located outdoors.
Inscription. "The Company of Undertakers for the Iron Works," consisting of English gentlemen and colonists, erected a furnace on this site in 1643. Joseph Jenks, their employe, built a forge here in 1647, invented the modern type of scythe, and built Boston's first fire engine.
 
Erected 1930 by Massachusetts Bay Colony-Tercentenary Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Massachusetts Bay Colony—Tercentenary Commission Markers marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 42° 28.121′ N, 71° 0.547′ W. Marker was in Saugus, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker was on Central Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Saugus MA 01906, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Making Iron (within shouting distance of this marker); The Casting House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); River Basin Terminus (about 400 feet away); The Forge (about 400 feet away); Blacksmith Shop (about 600 feet away); Appleton's Pulpit
Iron Works Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 1, 2015
2. Iron Works Marker
The marker is in the audiovisual/presentation room at the Saugus Iron Works Museum (to the far left in the photo).
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Saugus Vietnam Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Saugus Korea/Vietnam Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Saugus.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located in the museum of the National Park Service, Saugus Iron Works, National Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Saugus Iron Works, National Historic Site. European iron makers brought their special skills to the Massachusetts Bay Colony early in the settlement of New England. Three hundred year old artifacts, working waterwheels, and mill machinery helps to tell the story of a business failure destined to be a National Park. (Submitted on October 12, 2011, by Russell Chaffee Bixby of Bernardston, Massachusetts.) 

2. Historical Markers Erected by Massachusetts Bay Colony Tercentenary Commission (1930). Original 1930 publication by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts of Tercentenary Commission Markers, commemorating the three hundredth anniversary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. (Submitted on October 12, 2011, by Russell Chaffee Bixby of Bernardston, Massachusetts.) 
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
Saugus Iron Works-National Park Service-National Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Russell C. Bixby, October 9, 2011
3. Saugus Iron Works-National Park Service-National Historic Site
National Park Service Exhibition Building & Museum-Saugus Iron Works-National Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Russell C. Bixby, October 9, 2011
4. National Park Service Exhibition Building & Museum-Saugus Iron Works-National Historic Site
Earlier Iron Works Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 1, 2015
5. Earlier Iron Works Marker
This earlier marker is also on display in the audiovisual/presentation room at the Saugus Iron Works Museum. It reads:
The First Iron Works.
The first successful iron works in the country established here. Foundry erected in 1634. Joseph Jenks built a forge here in 1647. And in 1652 made the dies for the first silver money coined in New England. In 1654 he made the first fire engine in America. Erected by Lynn Historical Society 1898.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 12, 2011, by Russell Chaffee Bixby of Bernardston, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 556 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 12, 2011, by Russell Chaffee Bixby of Bernardston, Massachusetts.   2. submitted on July 26, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   3, 4. submitted on October 12, 2011, by Russell Chaffee Bixby of Bernardston, Massachusetts.   5. submitted on July 26, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement