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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jersey City in Hudson County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story

 
 
Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
1. Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story Marker
Inscription.
The stones you see here reveal yet another layer of the story of Ellis Island. This is the story of Fort Gibson, one of the earliest forts built after the American Revolution to protect New York Harbor. Discovered during the excavations for the American Immigrant Wall of Honor, these remains of the walls of Fort Gibson bear witness to the nearly 100 years when Ellis Island was used to ward off enemies rather than to welcome immigrants.

Two forts stood on the site. The first was a crescent-shaped structure of wood and sod built in 1794 on the edge of what was then the island’s shoreline. The stone and brick walls unearthed here were constructed between 1807 and 1811, when the fort was rebuilt just before the War of 1812 broke out between the United States and Great Britain. The fort was armed with approximately thirteen cannons and garrisoned 182 soldiers. It was also used fifty years later by Union forces during the Civil War.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 40° 41.941′ N, 74° 2.328′ W. Marker is in Jersey City, New Jersey, in Hudson County. Touch for map. Marker is located on the north side of Ellis Island, near the American Immigrant Wall of Honor. Marker is in this post office area: Jersey City NJ 07304, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Fort Gibson Marker (Left Side) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
2. Fort Gibson Marker (Left Side)
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Gibson: Uncovering the Past (here, next to this marker); The American Immigrant Wall of Honor ® (a few steps from this marker); Fort Gibson: Ammunition to Immigration (a few steps from this marker); Fort Gibson: Oyster Banks to Batteries (a few steps from this marker); Fort Gibson: Defending the Approaches (a few steps from this marker); Fort Gibson: The New York Harbor System (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The American Immigrant Wall of Honor ® (within shouting distance of this marker); Delaware Indian Burials (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jersey City.
 
More about this marker. A map on the marker depicts the current Ellis Island and indicates the shoreline in 1812 and the location of Fort Gibson on the island.
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
Fort Gibson Marker (right side) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
3. Fort Gibson Marker (right side)
Fort Gibson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
4. Fort Gibson Marker
Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
5. Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story Marker
The stones that were the walls of Fort Gibson can be seen behind the marker.
Markers on Ellis Island image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
6. Markers on Ellis Island
Two markers are found at this location. The Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story marker is seen here on the left.
Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
7. Fort Gibson: The Other Ellis Island Story Marker
Walls of Fort Gibson image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
8. Walls of Fort Gibson
Walls of Fort Gibson image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 7, 2011
9. Walls of Fort Gibson
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 8, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,031 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on November 8, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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