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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sandy Hook in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

30-Pounder Battery

 
 
30-Pounder Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
1. 30-Pounder Battery Marker
Inscription. Positioned here at the end of a towering plateau, this fortification was the first earthen battery built on the mountain by the Federals in the fall of 1862. Facing south, its guns "commanded perfectly the summits of Loudoun Heights as well as Bolivar Heights."

A four-sided earthwork forms the dominant feature of this battery. Protecting its exterior slope is a dry moat - the widest, longest, and most uniform moat on the mountain. 30-pounder Parrotts were standard armament here.
 
Location. 39° 19.895′ N, 77° 43.439′ W. Marker is in Sandy Hook, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Sandy Hook Road. Touch for map. Located on the Stone Fort Trail loop of Maryland Heights in Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Marker is in this post office area: Knoxville MD 21758, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Making a Mountain Citadel (approx. 0.2 miles away); 100 - Pounder Battery - Heaviest and Highest (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hiking Maryland Heights (approx. 0.2 miles away); Charcoal Making on Maryland Heights (approx. 0.2 miles away); Naval Battery (approx. mile
Battery Plan image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
2. Battery Plan
away); Exploring Maryland Heights (approx. 0.4 miles away); Maryland Heights - Mountain Fortress of Harpers Ferry (approx. 0.4 miles away); Harpers Ferry - Changes through Time (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sandy Hook.
 
More about this marker. On the right side of the marker is a depiction of the battery's interior.
On the left is the "30-Pounder Battery Plan." It reads, "George Kaiser's January 1863 illustration of the 30-pounder Battery shows many features of the earthwork." Key points indicated on the plan are the dry moat, rampart, gun platform, and magazine.

On the lower left is a side view of "A 30-pounder Parrott rifle on siege carriage, typical of a gun mounted here." Specifications for the gun given are: Bore diameter: 4.2", Length of tube: 136", Weight of tube: 4200 lbs., Weight of projectile: 29 lbs., Range: 2200 yards (1 1/4-mile).
 
Regarding 30-Pounder Battery. This marker is one of a set along the National Park Service's trail to the top of Maryland Heights. You can see the other markers in this set through the Maryland Heights Virtual Tour by Markers link below.
 
Also see . . .
30-Pounder Parrott image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
3. 30-Pounder Parrott

1. Maryland Heights. National Park Service details about the heights and the hiking trail. (Submitted on January 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Maryland Heights Virtual Tour by Markers. A set of markers relating the history of Maryland Heights in Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. (Submitted on February 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Powder Magazine in the Battery Works image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
4. Powder Magazine in the Battery Works
The Dry Moat of the Battery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
5. The Dry Moat of the Battery
Interior of the Battery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 22, 2007
6. Interior of the Battery
Looking over the parapets of the battery, some of the gun positions are still visible.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,244 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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