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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rome in Oneida County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817

Historic New York

 
 
The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
1. The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817 Marker
Inscription. The ceremonies outside the village of Rome on Independence Day, 1817, climaxed years of discussion about building the Erie Canal. Dignitaries and local citizens assembled at sunrise to attend the start of construction. Judge Joshua Hathaway, a veteran of two American Wars, spoke and began the excavation. Judge John Richardson, the first contractor, then turned the earth. Cannon boomed as others started digging.

Benjamin Wright, "the father of American engineering," assisted by John B. Jervis, supervised construction of the section between Utica and the Seneca River. In the first year, 15 miles were constructed. By October, 1819, the 98-mile section was completed, and the first boat traveled from Rome to Utica.

When finished in 1825, the Erie Canal was considered the foremost engineering achievement of the time. The 363-mile canal crossed the State and became the main route between the Atlantic Ocean and the Great Lakes. Western New York flourished with new, cheap transportation. The canal insured the place of New York City as the Nation's greatest port and city, and it hastened development of the Midwest.

The modernized State Barge Canal System, consisting of the Erie, Champlain, Oswego and Cayuga-Seneca Canals, was completed in 1918.
 
Erected 1967 by New York State
The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
2. The Erie Canal - July 4, 1817 Marker
The bridge behind the marker spans the enlarged Erie Canal.
Education Department.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Erie Canal, and the Historic New York marker series.
 
Location. 43° 13.552′ N, 75° 30.151′ W. Marker is in Rome, New York, in Oneida County. Marker can be reached from Fort Bull Road. Touch for map. The Marker is within the Erie Canal Village at the base of the embankment of the Fort Bull Road foot bridge over the canal. Marker is in this post office area: Rome NY 13440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Erie Canal Enlargement (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Bull (within shouting distance of this marker); Clinton's Ditch (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Bull (approx. 0.2 miles away); Erie Canal (approx. mile away); U.S. Arsenal (approx. 1.9 miles away); The Oneida Carrying Place (approx. 2.2 miles away); Stars & Stripes First Flew in Battle (approx. 2.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rome.
 
Also see . . .  Erie Canal Village website. (Submitted on December 12, 2011, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Clinton's Ditch
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Packet Boat Rides image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 17, 2008
3. Packet Boat Rides
The Erie Canal Village is a living history museum west of Rome New, York. They offer hores drawn packet boat rides on a section of the historic Erie Canal.
The Erie Canal image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
4. The Erie Canal
View of the Fort Bull Road Bridge spanning the old Erie Canal. The historic marker is located out of view, at the base of the bridge on the north (left) side.
The Erie Canal image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 29, 2011
5. The Erie Canal
View, looking west from the Fort Bull Road bridge, of the old Erie Canal.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 10, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 664 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 10, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   4, 5. submitted on April 9, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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