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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Milwaukee Road Depot

Frost and Granger, Architects

 

1903

 
Milwaukee Road Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
1. Milwaukee Road Depot Marker
Inscription. The Neoclassical Revival style former depot was designed by Frost and Granger of Chicago, regionally prominent designers of train depots. It is locally significant, representing the national dominance of rail for the transport of goods and people. Rail was vital to the economic growth of Madison, providing affordable transportation through the first half of the nineteenth century. Significant features include the long covered passenger platform with its prominent brick and limestone gateway, and the passenger and baggage depot buildings with arched window and door openings.

Designated September 8, 1975
 
Erected 2012 by the Madison Landmarks Commission. (Marker Number 35.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin, Madison Landmarks Commission marker series.
 
Location. 43° 4.075′ N, 89° 23.65′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is on West Washington Avenue 0.1 miles west of South Bedford Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Madison WI 53703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wiedenbeck-Dobelin Warehouse (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); James Doris Farmhouse
Milwaukee Road Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
2. Milwaukee Road Depot Marker
The marker is on one of the columns at the West Washington Avenue end of the covered platform.
(about 700 feet away); Washington Grade and Orthopedic School (approx. 0.2 miles away); American Tobacco Co. Warehouses (approx. 0.2 miles away); Spirit of Greenbush (approx. mile away); The Greenbush (approx. 0.3 miles away); Brittingham Boat House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Dowling Apartments (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding Milwaukee Road Depot. According to the Madison Landmarks Commission, "The first railroad depot in Madison was built on this site in 1853. The first railroad train arrived in Madison from Milwaukee on May 23, 1854. according to an eye witness: 'It was a grand, but strange spectacle to see this monster train, like some huge, unheard-of thing of life, with breath of smoke and flame, emerging from the green openings - scenes of pastoral beauty and quietude - beyond the placid waters of the lake.'

"This area became one of the liveliest places in Madison when the railroad was the only means of long-distance transportation. The new passenger depot was built on this site at a time when the
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
3. Milwaukee Road Depot
This is another view of the West Washington Avenue end of the platform, with " C M. ST. P. & P " (Chicago, Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Pacific Railroad) visible on the depot.
capital city was a rail hub of nine rail lines, providing linkages for farm, business, government and recreation. The construction of this imposing neo-classical building marked the heyday of the railroad as the prime mover of people and goods."
 
Also see . . .  Madison Landmarks Commission. The landmark nomination form for the building (pdf). (Submitted on March 4, 2012, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
4. Milwaukee Road Depot
This is the south side of the depot, with part of the platform now closed in for retail space.
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
5. Milwaukee Road Depot
This is a view of The Milwaukee Road engine and cars along the passenger platform on the south side of the depot.
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
6. Milwaukee Road Depot
A view of the depot building with arched window and door openings mentioned in the marker.
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
7. Milwaukee Road Depot
This is a view of an ancillary building at the depot.
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
8. Milwaukee Road Depot
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
9. Milwaukee Road Depot
This is a view of the west end of the passenger platform.
Milwaukee Road Depot image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
10. Milwaukee Road Depot
A closeup of the Camp Randall car at the west end of the train. Camp Randall is the football stadium for the University of Wisconsin, and trains were once a popular mode of transportation to the game.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 29, 2012, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 566 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 29, 2012, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on March 3, 2012, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.
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