Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Concordia in Cloud County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

National Orphan Train Complex

 
 
National Orphan Train Complex Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 27, 2011
1. National Orphan Train Complex Marker
Inscription.
What is the National Orphan Train Complex?
The restored Union Pacific depot contains museum displays and information devoted to national Orphan Train history. The Morgan-Dowell Research Center, the central office of the Complex, houses the Orphan Train archives, gift shop, and materials for visitors seeking information on Orphan Train Riders.

What were Orphan Trains?
From 1854 to 1929, over 250,000 orphaned, homeless, or abused children were taken from New York and other large eastern cities and transported by train to new homes all across America. Orphanages partnered with various railroads giving reduced fares to the children and the adults that accompanied them.

Why did Orphan Trains relocate children?
With the mass immigration into the U.S. in the 1800s, many families were stricken with poverty, sickness and unemployment, leading thousands of children to end up on the streets because their parents had died or could no longer care for them. An organization called the Children's Aid Society decided to turn this crisis around by removing these children from the treacherous city influences and taking them to rural settings where work, family, and education might mold the children into productive adults.

Is the Orphan Train influence felt today?
According
National Orphan Train Complex and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 27, 2011
2. National Orphan Train Complex and Marker
Morgan-McDowell Research Center in background
to modern-day research, one in every twenty-five Americans is connected to an Orphan Train Rider.

The Orphan Train was also the beginning of documented foster care in America.
 
Erected by National Orphan Train Complex.
 
Location. 39° 34.474′ N, 97° 39.707′ W. Marker is in Concordia, Kansas, in Cloud County. Marker is on 3rd Street near Washington Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 Washington Street, Concordia KS 66901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Union Pacific Railroad Passenger Depot (a few steps from this marker); Robert Francis Summers Memorial Clock (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown Grand Theatre (approx. mile away); Cloud County War Memorial (approx. 0.6 miles away); James Manny Hagaman (approx. 1.1 miles away); Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Memorial (approx. 1.2 miles away); Davies-Crook American Legion Post 76 War Memorial (approx. 1.2 miles away); World Wars Memorial (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Concordia.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. National Orphan Train Complex. (Submitted on March 10, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. A History of the Orphan Trains. (Submitted on March 10, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Orphan Train Bibliography. (Submitted on March 10, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. AgricultureCharity & Public WorkRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 10, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 509 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 10, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
Paid Advertisement