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Waynesboro in Wayne County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Incident at Waynesboro

A Case of Friendly Fire

 
 
Incident at Waynesboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
1. Incident at Waynesboro Marker
Inscription. In November 1863, military governor Andrew Johnson ordered Union Maj. John Murphy, 5th Tennessee Cavalry, to take charges of two companies of Union Guards in Nashville. These 200 newly mustered men were from Wayne County and vicinity and were not yet organized into a regular regiment. Johnson told Murphy to proceed with them to Waynesboro and open a recruiting office. As they traveled along the old Natchez Trace, the Federals had several minor engagements with small parties of Confederate partisans and soon learned to be wary of guerrilla tricks, disguises and ambushes.

As Murphy’s column made its way here, the veteran 7th Illinois Mounted Infantry was returning from duty at Hamburg Landing on the Tennessee River, heading for Pulaski. As they marched along the Pinbook- Waynesboro road, they halted about two miles outside the county seat to eat and feed their mounts. After dinner, the Illinois soldiers galloped into Waynesboro, not suspecting what was about to happen.

A Waynesboro citizen who saw the Illinois men riding hard toward town thought that they were Confederates. As he fled in the opposite direction, he ran directly into Murphy’s column. When asked if he had seen any guerrillas, the citizen pointed toward the Illinois regiment’s advance guard, and the fighting began. Bullets flew several minutes, wounding
Wayne County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
2. Wayne County Courthouse
three, until respective commanders determined that they were on the same side. Afterward, the 5th Tennessee occupied Waynesboro while the 7th Illinois marched to camp at the Pointer Brothers’ iron furnace five miles east of town.

"The Fifth Tennessee having been deceived so often by guerillas dressed in federal uniforms, they have in consequence become very vigilant." - Sgt. D. Leib Ambrose, 7th Illinois Mounted Infantry
 
Erected 2012 by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 19.176′ N, 87° 45.757′ W. Marker is in Waynesboro, Tennessee, in Wayne County. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Public Square, Waynesboro TN 38485, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sons of Confederate Veterans (a few steps from this marker); Wayne County World War II Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Wayne County Revolutionary War Veterans (within shouting distance of this marker); Waynesboro Operation Enduring Freedom & Operation Iraqi Freedom Monument (within
Waynesboro town square, ca 1890 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
3. Waynesboro town square, ca 1890
“The Fifth Tennessee having been deceived so often by guerillas dressed in federal uniforms, they have in consequences become very vigilant.” – Sgt D. Leib Ambrose 7th Illinois Mounted Infantry
shouting distance of this marker); Difficult Times (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Army of Tennessee (approx. 5 miles away); Sweetwater Branch (approx. 7.8 miles away); Dogwood Mudhole (approx. 9.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waynesboro.
 
More about this marker. This marker is currently displayed in the courthouse. Issues arose with the placement of the marker at the intended location. The marker will be place somewhere next to Wayne Co Courthouse. Marker was to be place February 2012.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
"Union Bushwackers Attacking image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, March 13, 2012
4. "Union Bushwackers Attacking
rebel Cavalry, Junius H. Browne, Four Years in Secessia (1866)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 15, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 397 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 15, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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