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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Moncks Corner in Berkeley County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Fair Lawn: An Archeaological Treasure

 
 
Fort Fair Lawn: An Archeaological Treasure Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
1. Fort Fair Lawn: An Archeaological Treasure Marker
Inscription. Fair Lawn Plantation was an enormous property granted to Sir Peter Colleton, oldest son of Sir John Colleton, one of the original eight Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. During the Revolutionary War, the British army first occupied the plantation in July 1781, turning the mansion, known as Colleton House, into a hospital and armory. Over the course of the summer, British troops (and probably black slaves from the area) fortified Colleton House with an abatis ~ a row of sharp stakes pointed outward to defend against an attack ~ and constructed Fort Fairlawn about half a mile away. Of primarily earthen construction and garrisoned by about fifty soldiers, Fort Fairlawn was designed to guard the plantationís Cooper River landing.

In September 1781, the plantation was an important staging ground for the Battle of Eutaw Springs, and afterwards it was one of the few posts outside of Charleston where the British maintained a strong presence. On November 17, when Whig militiamen under the command of Col. Hezekiah Maham and Col. Isaac Shelby attacked Colleton House, the outnumbered troops inside Fort Fairlawn made no move to defend their comrades. On November 24, the British abandoned the fort.

Among the few Revolutionary War structures in South Carolina that are still visible, the well-preserved remains of Fort Fairlawn
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
2. Overview
are currently under private ownership.
 
Erected 2012 by Francis Marion Trail Commission of Francis Marion University.
 
Location. 33° 11.6′ N, 79° 58.317′ W. Marker is near Moncks Corner, South Carolina, in Berkeley County. Marker can be reached from Stony Landing Road. Touch for map. Marker is inside Old Santee Canal Park. Marker is in this post office area: Moncks Corner SC 29461, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Colleton House: “Unmanly Practices” or Legitimate Target? (a few steps from this marker); C.S.S. David (within shouting distance of this marker); Berkeley County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Stony Landing House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Santee Canal (about 700 feet away); Wadboo Barony (approx. 1.1 miles away); Wadboo Barony: Francis Marionís Last Headquarters (approx. 1.1 miles away); First Site of Moncks Corner (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moncks Corner.
 
Categories. Colonial EraWar, US Revolutionary
 
Drawing on the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
3. Drawing on the Marker
Drawing of a Scottish soldier. The 84th Regiment of the British Army, a Scottish unit, garrisoned Fort Fairlawn. Courtesy Charles M. Lefferts.
Drawing on the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
4. Drawing on the Marker
Layout drawing of Fort Fairlawn from a 1990 archaeological investigation. The four-sided earthen structure included an entrance port on the Cooper River, a cistern for water storage, and a protective moat.Courtesy Brockington and Associates
Photograph on marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 24, 2012
5. Photograph on marker
Contemporary photograph of the remains of Fort Fairlawn. Even overgrown with vegetation, one corner of the earthen walls and part of the moat are clearly visible.Courtesy Cathi Lee
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 25, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,235 times since then and 209 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 25, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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