Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New London in New London County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Jonathan Brooks Tomb 1786

 
 
Jonathan Brooks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
1. Jonathan Brooks Marker
Inscription.
In memory of
Jonathan Brooks
1768 – 1848
A boy patriot of the American
Revolution

 
Location. 41° 21.559′ N, 72° 6.036′ W. Marker is in New London, Connecticut, in New London County. Marker can be reached from Hempstead Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in New London's Ye Antientist Burial Ground, on Hempstead Street between Granite and Bristol Streets. Marker is in this post office area: New London CT 06320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. City of New London (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Winthrop (about 300 feet away); Hempstead Historic District (approx. 0.2 miles away); Williams Memorial Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); 21st Regt. Conn. Vol. (approx. 0.2 miles away); New London War Dead (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nathan Hale (approx. 0.2 miles away); New London War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New London.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Jonathan Brooks Tomb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
2. Jonathan Brooks Tomb Marker
Jonathan Brooks Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
3. Jonathan Brooks Tomb
Ye Antientist Burial Ground image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
4. Ye Antientist Burial Ground
The Jonathan Brooks Tomb (seen to the right of the sign) is located in Ye Antientist Burial Ground in New London, one of the earliest graveyards in New England, and the oldest colonial cemetery in New London County.
Ye Antientist Burial Ground image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
5. Ye Antientist Burial Ground
During the September 6, 1781 Battle of Groton, British Gen. Benedict Arnold is said to have watched his men attack and burn the City of New London from this site.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 2, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 634 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 2, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
Paid Advertisement