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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond Hill in Yadkin County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Richmond Hill

“Though the Heavens Fall”

 
 
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
1. Richmond Hill Marker
Inscription. Richmond Hill was the home of North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Richmond Mumford Pearson (1805-1878) and his family. Pearson conducted a law school from 1848 to 1878 in a small building located west of this house. Students lived in log cabins near Pearson's home, or boarded with area families, some across the Yadkin River at Rockford. Pearson reportedly taught a thousand students.

Pearson, who served as chief justice from 1858 to 1787, opposed secession. During the Civil War, he championed individual rights over the power of the Confederate government. When Confederate conscription laws were enacted and med were arrested for avoiding the draft or deserting the army, Pearson (who believed the laws were unconstitutional) issued writs of habeas corpus to release several men from the county jail. The writs required a prison official to bring the prisoner into court to determine whether he had been imprisoned unlawfully and, if the judge ruled, to free him. The Confederate government denounced Pearson's stand on conscription and North Carolina Gov. Zebulon B. Vance continued to use the Home Guard to pursue and arrest deserters. Pearson persisted, however, declaring "Let justice be done though the heavens fall."

During Reconstruction, Pearson presided at the impeachment trial of Gov. William W. Holden. Pearson
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
2. Richmond Hill Marker
Richmond M. Pearson
was the only high-ranking state official to hold office during both the Civil War and Reconstruction and to die while still in office. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh.

[Inset:]
North Carolina Supreme Court Justice Richmond M. Pearson constructed this house about 1860. It combines elements of the Greek Revival and Tuscan architectural styles and has simple Greek-Revival-style interior woodwork. The Historic Richmond Hill Law School Commission restored the house.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 16.03′ N, 80° 36.78′ W. Marker is in Richmond Hill, North Carolina, in Yadkin County. Touch for map. Located beyond the terminus of Law School Road in the Historic Richmond Hill Nature Park. Marker is in this post office area: East Bend NC 27018, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Richmond Hill (a few steps from this marker); Rockford (approx. 2 miles away); Richmond Pearson (approx. 3.2 miles away); Reeves Homeplace (approx. 3.3 miles away); Bond School House
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
3. Richmond Hill Marker
Zebulon B. Vance
(approx. 6.3 miles away); Bond Schoolhouse (approx. 6.3 miles away); Deep Creek Friends Meeting (approx. 6.3 miles away); Common High Flyers of Pilot Mountain (approx. 8.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond Hill.
 
Categories. EducationPoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
4. Richmond Hill Marker
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
5. Richmond Hill Marker
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
6. Richmond Hill Marker
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
7. Richmond Hill Marker
Richmond Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 16, 2012
8. Richmond Hill Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 17, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 366 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 17, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   3. submitted on April 18, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on April 17, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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