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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Ararat in Patrick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Laurel Hill

The Birthplace of James Ewell Brown Stuart

 
 
Laurel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
1. Laurel Hill Marker
Inscription. Laurel Hill, the 1,500-acre farm of Archibald and Elizabeth Letcher Pannill Stuart, was the birthplace of their seventh child, James Ewell Brown Stuart, at 11 a.m. on February 6, 1833. The house burned to the ground during the winter of 1847-48.

"Jeb" Stuart attended Emory and Henry College in southwestern Virginia (1848-50) and the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York (1850-54). After serving as an officer in the U.S. cavalry in Texas and Kansas (1854-61), and assisting in the capture of John Brown at Harpers Ferry in 1859, he resigned his commission when Virginia seceded in 1861.

As trhe commander of Gen. Robert E. Lee's cavalry in the Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War, Stuart expanded the contribution of the mounted arm as the "eyes and ears" of the army. He achieved fame for the first "Ride Around McLellan" during the Seven Days' Battles east of Richmond, temporarily commanded Jackson's corps after Stonewall fell wounded at Chancelorsville, and thoroughly dominated the Union cavalry for most of his career. Stuart was mortally wounded on May 11,1864, at the Battle of Yellow Tavern, died in Richmond the next day, and is buried there at Hollywood Cemetery.

Two of his brothers, also born at Laurel Hill, likewise served the Confederacy during the war. William Alexander Stuart
Laurel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
2. Laurel Hill Marker
operated the alkali works in Saltville, where while John Dabney Stuart served as a surgeon in the 54th Virginia Infantry Regiment.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 33.7′ N, 80° 33.18′ W. Marker is near Ararat, Virginia, in Patrick County. Marker is on Ararat Highway (County Route 773), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in from of Laurel Hill visitors center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1091 Ararat Hwy, Ararat VA 24053, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stuart's Birthplace (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Roadbed (within shouting distance of this marker); The "Lee" Tree (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); "Stuart the Raider" (about 500 feet away); "Stuart the Scout" (about 500 feet away); "Stuart the Commander" (about 500 feet away); "Stuart the Leader" (about 500 feet away); "Flora and Jeb" (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ararat.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Laurel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
3. Laurel Hill Marker
Laurel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
4. Laurel Hill Marker
Jeb Stuart image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
5. Jeb Stuart
Laurel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
6. Laurel Hill Marker
Site of Stuart's birth image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
7. Site of Stuart's birth
Laurel Hill entrance sign image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
8. Laurel Hill entrance sign
Laurel Hill Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 21, 2012
9. Laurel Hill Stone Marker
Entered on the National Register of Historic Places on September 24, 1998

Entered on the Virginia Landmarks Register on January 23, 1998
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 21, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 22, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 571 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on April 22, 2012, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.   9. submitted on November 21, 2016, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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