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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps

 
 
Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
1. Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps,

Maj. Gen. D.N. Couch, Commanding.
September 16-18, 1862.


On the 16th, Couch's Division was drawn up across Pleasant Valley near Rohrersville, observing McLaws' command. On the morning of the 17th, the Division marched nearly to Harper's Ferry, then countermarched and bivouacked that night on the Huffer Farm about a half mile south of Keedysville.

It reached the field about 11 a.m., on the 18th, Cochrane's Brigade relieved Irwin's Brigade of Smith's Division, Sixth Corps, behind the ridge east of the Hagerstown Pike and the Brigades of Devens and Howe formed in rear of Brook's Brigade of Smith's Division, Sixth Corps, and French's Division, Second Corps.

The Division was not engaged in the action.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 76.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.267′ N, 77° 44.5′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Bloody Lane, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps Marker
At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sixth Army Corps ( here, next to this marker); 1st Delaware Volunteers ( within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Sixth Army Corps ( within shouting distance of this marker); 5th Maryland Infantry ( within shouting distance of this marker); Jackson's Command ( within shouting distance of this marker); French's Division, Second Army Corps ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Second Army Corps ( about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Second Army Corps ( about 300 feet away); 130th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry ( about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Second Army Corps ( about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Regarding Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps. This marker is included on the Sunken Road or Bloody Lane Virtual Tour by Markers see the Virtual tour link below to see the markers in sequence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 1st Division, IV Corps, Army of the Potomac. Comprised of three infantry Brigades and four batteries of artillery, the Division,
Tablets 73 and 76 Beside Richardson Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Tablets 73 and 76 Beside Richardson Avenue
the Division was not involved in the major fighting of the battle. While listed as part of the IV Corps, the Division was attached to the VI Corps and is also called the "Third Division, VI Corps." (Submitted on February 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Sunken Road or Bloody Lane Virtual Tour by Markers. A collection of markers interpreting the action of during the Battle of Antietam around the Sunken Road. (Submitted on February 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Unused Divisions
Couch's Division demonstrates a point raised often by military historians with respect to General George B. McClellan's generalship at Antietam. Here was a fresh division of troops, which moved around the battle field area, but remained unused. On the opposite side, Confederate General Robert E. Lee was shifting and reusing what ever troops he had at hand to cover the crisis of the moment.

This difference between the two armies with regard to tactical execution is manifest in the War Department markers. Often Union brigades and divisions are given only one tablet, indicating the solitary point at which the unit fought. On the other side, Confederate units may have two or sometimes three tablets, often
Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Couch's Division, Fourth Army Corps Marker
spread across as much as half a mile.
    — Submitted February 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 860 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on September 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 17, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on September 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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