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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Evacuation of Savannah

 
 
Evacuation of Savannah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 2008
1. Evacuation of Savannah Marker
Inscription. On Dec. 14, 1864, Fort McAllister (CS) having fallen the day before, opening the Great Ogeechee River to Union shipping and rendering Savannah untenable, Lt. Gen. W. J. Hardee, CSA, decided to evacuate the city to save it from a destructive bombardment and to extricate his besieged army. River craft being unequal to the task and no pontoon bridging being available, an engineering expedient was adopted. Directed by Lt. Col. B. W. Frobel, CSA, pontoon type bridges were laid by sailors of the CS Navy and details from the Georgia Militia. Using large "cotton flats" for boats, car wheels for anchors and planks from the city wharves for flooring, a bridge was laid from the foot of West Broad Street to Hutchinson Island, another across Back River to Pennyworth Island, and a third across Little Back River to the South Carolina shore.

On the 19th, orders were issued giving priorities and times of withdrawal. The heavy guns were spiked and carriages and ammunition destroyed. At dark, the garrisons of Whitemarsh Island were withdrawn into the city and evacuated via the bridges.

At dark on the 20th, the garrisons of Causton's Bluff, Thunderbolt and the Savannah River batteries gathered at Fort Jackson and were transferred by steamer to Screven's Ferry; but the main garrison -- infantry, cavalry, light artillery and wagons -- crossed
Evacuation of Savannah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Evacuation of Savannah Marker
on the bridges. Well before dawn, the rear-guard had cleared Hutchinson Island, the bridge from West Broad Street had been cut adrift, and the troops were marching via the Union Causeway to Hardeeville.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 025-52.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Shermans March to the Sea marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.905′ N, 81° 5.661′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on West Bay Street near Jefferson Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jonathan Bryan (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ships That Carried the Name Savannah (about 400 feet away); John Ryan's Excelsior Bottle Works (about 400 feet away); John Herndon “Johnny” Mercer (about 400 feet away); SS Savannah and SS John Randolph (about 500 feet away); William Bartram Trail (about 500 feet away); Haitian Monument (about 500 feet away); Settlement of Savannah (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Regarding Evacuation of Savannah.
Evacuation of Savannah Marker, at a small park along W. Bay St. in Savannah image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Evacuation of Savannah Marker, at a small park along W. Bay St. in Savannah
In the Civil War, the Thunderbolt Battery was instrumental in the defense of Savannah. Thunderbolt never fell to the enemy, and increased armament and river obstructions kept the Union forces from landing. It was the advance of Union troops on Fort McAllister by land that led to the evacuation of Savannah and Thunderbolt Battery. Nothing remains of the Thunderbolt Battery today due to a combination of initial neglect and commercial and industrial development.
 
Also see . . .
1. Evacuation Of Savannah article Written by Rev George Adams Blount on May 25, 1903. It was a night of terror, for no one knew what the morrow would bring forth. Sherman had burned Atlanta and had driven the helpless women and children into exile. What he would do to Savannah was a question often asked, but no one could answer. (Submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Sherman's Fifth Corps, by Major James A. Connolly, 123rd Illinois Infantry. "The evacuation of Savannah by the Confederate army, which took place last night, left the gates to the city open, and General Sherman, with his army will, no doubt, to-day take possession." (Submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. CSS Georgia and Evacuation of Savannah. Since she lacked effective locomotive power, the Confederates found it necessary
CSS Georgia image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
4. CSS Georgia
to burn and destroy her during the evacuation of Savannah on December 21, 1864. (Submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. Our Georgia History , Ft McAllister. the fort was the only obstacle preventing General Sherman from reaching the friendly fleet just off the Georgia coast. (Submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,493 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on December 19, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on February 21, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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