Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chancellorsville in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Chancellor Slaves

 
 
The Chancellor Slaves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
1. The Chancellor Slaves Marker
Inscription. Their names are unrecorded, their labors are rarely noted. No images of them survive. But slaves outnumbered Chancellor family members when Frances Chancellor moved into this house in 1861. Likely only a few of the 20 slaves owned by the Chancellors occupied the house itself. Most probably lived in cabins scattered across the Chancellors' 300 acres of farmland. The slaves' overseer James Moxley lived at Fairview, a quarter mile to the southwest.

When the Union army arrived at Fredericksburg in spring 1862, hundreds - perhaps thousands - of Spotsylvania's 6,000 slaves escaped into Union lines. The Chancellor slaves were among those who fled. By May 1863 only one slave remained with the family: a young girl whose mother had left months earlier. When the house caught fire and the Chancellors fled, they left the girl behind - her fate unknown. Most likely she passed into Union lines - to freedom.
 
Erected by Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park.
 
Location. 38° 18.527′ N, 77° 38.085′ W. Marker is in Chancellorsville, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Plank Road / Germania Highway (State Highway 3) and Elys Ford Road (County Route 610), on the right when traveling
Markers Beside the Chancellorsville Inn Ruins image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
2. Markers Beside the Chancellorsville Inn Ruins
east on Plank Road / Germania Highway. Touch for map. Located at stop three of the driving tour of Chancellorsville Battlefield, the Chancellorsville Inn. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22407, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civilians in the Crossfire (here, next to this marker); Chancellorsville Home of Mrs. Sanford Chancellor (here, next to this marker); Climactic Struggle (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee's Greatest Triumph (within shouting distance of this marker); Chancellorsville (within shouting distance of this marker); The Chancellorsville Intersection (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Chancellorsville (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chancellorsville Clearing (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chancellorsville.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker is a depiction of a slave household captioned, "Most of Spotsylvania's slaves worked in the fields and lived in modest quarters like those shown here."
 
Regarding The Chancellor Slaves. This is one of several markers for the Battle of Chancellorsville at the Chancellorsville Intersection, scene of considerable fighting in the battle. See
Burial Site image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
3. Burial Site
Near the marker is this tombstone marked:

Burial Site of Two Rowley Infants
CA. 1912 and 1915.
the Chancellorsville Intersection Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a listing of related markers on the tour.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Chancellorsville. National Park Service site. (Submitted on November 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Chancellorsville Intersection Virtual Tour by Markers. The Chancellorsville Intersection portion of the battlefield (stop three on the driving tour of the battlefield) includes markers at the intersection of the historic Plank and Ely's Ford Roads. Considerable fighting occurred here on May 3, 1863. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,507 times since then and 81 times this year. Last updated on February 22, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement