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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Army Corps

Christian's Brigade, Rickett's Division

 
 
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. First Army Corps Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
First Army Corps
Christian's Brigade, Rickett's Division,

Col. W.A. Christian, 26th New York, Commanding.
Organization.
26th and 94th New York, 88th and 90th
Pennsylvania Infantry.
(September 17, 1862.)

Christian's Brigade advanced from the Poffenberger woods in support of Hartsuff's left. The 90th Pennsylvania was detached to the support of Matthews' Pennsylvania Battery in the field between D.R. Miller's and the East Woods, but soon thereafter rejoined the Brigade, which moved through the East Woods and came into line on either side of the Smoketown Road, the 26th and 94th New York forming on the west edge of the East Woods, south of the Smoketown Road. The 88th Pennsylvania fought on the line of and, finally relieved, the 83rd New York, which was the left of Hartsuff's Brigade, the 90th Pennsylvania relieving the right of Hartsuff's Brigade and charging about 40 yards beyond it. The Brigade fought until its ammunition ws nearly exhausted when it was relieved by the advance of the Twelfth Corps. This tablet marks the point reached by the 90th Pennsylvania.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 9.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. First Army Corps Marker

 
Location. 39° 28.87′ N, 77° 44.646′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Cornfield Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located between stops three and four of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery B (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); Jackson's Command (a few steps from this marker); U.S. Artillery (a few steps from this marker); Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); First New Jersey Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 90th Pennslyvania (within shouting distance of this marker); 27th Indiana Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 137th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Batlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
War Department Tablets and 1st Maryland Light Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. War Department Tablets and 1st Maryland Light Position
Federal Tablets 10 (closest, Hartsuff's Brigade) and 9 (Christian's) are on the left side of the road. Tablet 337 for Ripley's Confederates stands on the right. Four 12-pdr Napoleons cover the Maryland state monument for Battery B, 1st Maryland Light Artillery. This point was another of the "hot corners" of the cornfield sector.
 

2. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, I Corps. The brigade boasted three Medal of Honor awardees from the battle of Antietam. Two were from the 90th Pa Regiment. A third, Private Charles Cleveland, was cited for retrieving the 26th New York's colors from a wounded comrade. (Submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Matthews Battery. Mentioned in the text, Battery F, 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery, commanded by Captain Ezra W. Matthews, was part of Ricketts' Division's assigned artillery. Armed with 3-inch Ordnance Rifles, the battery remained in a position north of the cornfield through most of the engagement. (Submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Poor Bill Christian - A Biography of William A. Christian. (Submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. First Army Corps Marker
Colonel William A. Christian (1825-1887) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Colonel William A. Christian (1825-1887)
East End of the Cornfield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
6. East End of the Cornfield
Looking south across the cornfield, in the distance on the Avenue are the four tall monuments (from left to right the 137th Pa, 128th Pa, 104th NY, and Georgia State Monuments) in that length of the road. Initially Harstuff's Brigade was on line generally along the field's border on the left of frame, about half way down that edge. Christian's Brigade extended the line from about that halfway point to where the modern Cornfield Avenue (that did not exist at the time of the battle) comes into the picture. The charge of the 90th Pennsylvania carried them almost to the two trees in the center along the Avenue. Today, that is the location of the unique regimental monument.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 759 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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