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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gainesville in Alachua County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

First Gainesville Skirmish / Battle of Gainesville

 
 
First Gainesville Skirmish Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 29, 2012
1. First Gainesville Skirmish Marker
Inscription.
First Gainesville Skirmish
The first Civil War gunfire in Gainesville's streets came on February 15, 1864, when a raiding party of 50 men from the 40th Massachusetts Cavalry entered the City to attempt the capture of two trains. The raid was unproductive, for the Federal troops were met and repulsed by the Second Florida Cavalry at what is now Main Street at University Avenue. Five days later, the main Federal force was defeated at the battle of Olustee, 50 miles to the north.

Battle of Gainesville
A Civil War battle was fought in Gainesville on August 17, 1864, when about 300 occupying Federal Troops were attacked by Florida Cavalry under Captain J.J. Dickison, called "Florida's most conspicuous soldier." The Federals were driven from the City after a brisk fight and suffered severe casualties during hard pursuit, which ended in victory for the Confederate force.
 
Erected 1969 by Florida Board of Parks and Historic Memorials. (Marker Number F-164.)
 
Location. 29° 39.141′ N, 82° 19.399′ W. Marker is in Gainesville, Florida, in Alachua County. Touch for map. Located between 1st Street NE & 3rd Street NE at Municipal Bldg. southside plaza. Marker is at or near this
Battle of Gainesville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 29, 2012
2. Battle of Gainesville Marker
postal address: 200 E. University Avenue, Gainesville FL 32601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. City of Gainesville (a few steps from this marker); East Florida Seminary (a few steps from this marker); Spanish Cattle Ranching (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Soldier Memorial (was about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported permanently removed. ); Alachula County Courthouse (about 600 feet away); Josiah T. Walls (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Gainesville Servicemen's Center / Thelma Boltin Center (approx. 0.2 miles away); Roper Park / Old City Park (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gainesville.
 
Regarding First Gainesville Skirmish / Battle of Gainesville. First Skirmish of Gainesville
Gainesville, site of a railroad junction and depot in north central Florida, was the scene of two small-scale engagements during the war. On 14 February 1864, the first battle occurred when about 50 Union troops entered the city intending to capture two trains. Company H of the 2nd Florida Cavalry with 130 men attempted to repulse this raid but were defeated by the Union force, which successfully returned to Jacksonville after holding the town.
First Gainesville Skirmish side of Marker, at the Municipal Building southside plaza image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 29, 2012
3. First Gainesville Skirmish side of Marker, at the Municipal Building southside plaza
(Wikipedia entry The Battle of Gainesville)
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Gainesville. ... took place on August 17, 1864, in the town square. The fighting was viewed by many of the townspeople from the windows of the Beville house near downtown. Three hundred forty-two Union troops of the 75th Ohio Mounted infantry, reinforced by two companies of the 4th Massachusetts Cavalry and supported by a battery of 3 cannons from Battery A, 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery under the command of Col. Andrew L. Harris occupying the city were attacked from the rear by some 200 soldiers of the Second Florida Cavalry, under the command of Captain John Jackson Dickison (companies H and F), supported by local militia, elements of 5th Florida Cavalry Battalion and a small artillery battery of two cannons for a total strength of about 290 (although only 175 would be engaged in the actual fighting). (Submitted on July 4, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. John Jackson Dickison, from Wikipedia. Dickison and his men were victorious in all of his raids against the Union troops in Florida, including his raid in Gainsville(sic) what is known as the "Battle of Gainsville"(sic). Tragedy struck Dickison, when one of his sons, both of whom served under his command, was killed during a raid. (Submitted on July 4, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
Battle of Gainesville side of marker at the Municipal Building southside plaza image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 29, 2012
4. Battle of Gainesville side of marker at the Municipal Building southside plaza
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
First Gainesville Skirmish / Battle of Gainesville Marker, center, at Municipal Building plaza image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 29, 2012
5. First Gainesville Skirmish / Battle of Gainesville Marker, center, at Municipal Building plaza
Portrait of Confederate Captain John Jackson Dickison, taken in 1864. image. Click for full size.
State Library and Archives of Florida;
6. Portrait of Confederate Captain John Jackson Dickison, taken in 1864.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 791 times since then and 91 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 4, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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