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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jackson's Command

Ripley's Brigade, D.H. Hill's Division

 
 
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. Jackson's Command Marker
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Jackson's Command,
Ripley's Brigade, D.H. Hill's Division,

Brigadier General R.S. Ripley, Commanding.
Organization.
1st and 3rd North Carolina, 4th and 44th Georgia Infantry.
(Septemer 17, 1862.)

Late in the afternoon of September 16, Ripley's Brigade moved from the right of the division line near the Boonsboro Pike and bivouacked a short distance south of Mumma's House. Early in the morning of the 17th it formed in support of Trimble's Brigade and moved past the burning Mumma buildings in the direction of the south end of the East Woods. When Hood relieved Lawton's Division the brigade moved by the left flank along the west edge of the East Woods, crossed the Smoketown Road south of this point and moved north to Hood's support. It filled an interval in the line of battle, made successive charges into Miller's Cornfield and was severely engaged with the advance of the Twelfth Corps. The right of the Confederate line being turned by an attack of Green's Division, Twelfth Corps, the Brigade after several changes of position and a stubborn resistance was obliged to retire to the woods around the Dunkard Church and was not again engaged.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 337.)
 
Marker series.
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Jackson's Command Marker
This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.864′ N, 77° 44.65′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Cornfield Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located between stops three and four of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); Battery B (a few steps from this marker); Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); U.S. Artillery (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); 90th Pennslyvania (within shouting distance of this marker); First New Jersey Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 27th Indiana Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 137th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
War Department Tablets and 1st Maryland Light Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. War Department Tablets and 1st Maryland Light Position
Federal Tablets 10 (closest, Hartsuff's Brigade) and 9 (Christian's) are on the left side of the road. Tablet 337 for Ripley's Confederates stands on the right. Four 12-pdr Napoleons cover the Maryland state monument for Battery B, 1st Maryland Light Artillery. This point was another of the "hot corners" of the cornfield sector.
 

2. Ripley's Brigade. When Brig. Gen. Ripley was wounded, command passed to Col. George Doles. Doles remained in command of the brigade through the following year and a half, but was killed in the battle of Cold Harbor in 1864. (Submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Roswell S. Ripley. Roswell Sabine Ripley (March 14, 1823 – March 29, 1887) was an officer in the United States Army during the Mexican-American War and, despite being Northern-born, a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. He was also an author and a prosperous South Carolina businessman. (Submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Jackson's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Jackson's Command Marker
Brig. General Roswell S. Ripley (1823-1887) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Brig. General Roswell S. Ripley (1823-1887)
Ripley's Brigade fought in the Maryland Campaign in September 1862. He suffered a severe wound in the neck at Antietam, but soon recovered and rejoined the army.
Looking at the Mumma's Farm image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Looking at the Mumma's Farm
Looking southwest down the Smoketown Road toward the Mumma's Farm area. The cemetery is seen in the background to the left. At the time of the battle the ground on the left (south) side of the road was field. To the right side was the southernmost edge of the East Woods. Ripley's Brigade moved forward into the Mumma fields, then cut across the edge of the woods to the right. This placed the Brigade on the left flank of Christian's Federal Brigade of Ricketts' Division.
Confederate Retreat from the Cornfield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
7. Confederate Retreat from the Cornfield
Looking south toward the Visitors Center from the marker location. When Greene's Division of the XII Corps crashed through the East Woods, the Confederates defending on the eastern side of the Cornfield fell back through this field to the south of Cornfield Avenue. The ground naturally funnels movement right back to the Dunker Church along the Hagerstown Pike. When the order to fall back was given, Ripley's Brigade was in line of battle along the right side of the photo facing toward the Hagerstown Pike. Thus during the confused fighting the unit that had been the right flank of the Confederate line was defending the left!
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 680 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on February 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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