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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Market in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New Market

A New Town for a New Road

 
 
New Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, February 24, 2008
1. New Market Marker
Inscription. As Fredericktown was born in 1745, German farmers were already hauling their grain to the port of Baltimore. By the 1780s, new communities were springing up along busy wagon routes. Two speculators, Nicholas Hall and William Plummer, competed to sell lots along a strip of road just a one-day wagon trip east of Frederick. When Mr. Hall sold the first nineteen lots on June 1, 1793, the town of New Market was born.

New Market was soon a major stop on a public road. After 1805, the “all weather” Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike became the first leg of the National Road.

During the next three decades, over three million travelers used the road. They paid 25 cents for lodging and 5 cents for a whiskey at eight New Market hotels and taverns. Today, this historic village still welcomes travelers to antique shops, restaurants and a small general store, where you can still pick up provisions.
 
Erected by America's Byways.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 22.972′ N, 77° 16.23′ W. Marker is in New Market, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Main Street (Maryland Route 144) west of Prospect Street
New Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, February 24, 2008
2. New Market Marker
(Maryland Route 874), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8 West Main Street, New Market MD 21774, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Market in the Civil War (a few steps from this marker); 13 West Main Street (a few steps from this marker); 9 West Main Street (a few steps from this marker); 5 West Main Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 3 West Main Street (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named New Market (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named New Market in the Civil War (approx. ¼ mile away); Mile Stones of the old National Pike (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Market.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a facsimile of a newspaper clipping, In 1787, Nicholas Hall tired to sell lots fronting a wide road in the "Town to be called New Market," each for "three pound currency money.

In the lower center is a photograph of one of the hotels: During the 1800s, New Market was noted for its many fine hotels. The still-thriving Utz Hotel, photographed around 1900, faced the National Hotel across the street. Today, the Utz survives as Mealey’s Restaurant,
New Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 12, 2016
3. New Market Marker
At lower left of photo, with the former Utz Hotel in background
behind you.


In the lower right a photo of a horse buggy is captioned, The Post Office was located in the old National Hotel across the road at #5 Main Street, circa 1890.The background of the marker is "National Road at Fairview Inn" which is the standard for markers in this series. An elevation diagram of the national road is displayed on the bottom of the marker's face.
 
Also see . . .  New Market: A New Town for a New Road. PDF version of the marker. (Submitted on March 12, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRoads & Vehicles
 
New Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 12, 2016
4. New Market Marker
This near-identical marker panel apparently replaced the one photographed in 2008 in its original location
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 7, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 25, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 964 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 25, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   3, 4. submitted on October 7, 2016, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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