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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Longstreet's Command

Law's Brigade, Hood's Division

 
 
Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Longstreet's Command Marker
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Longstreet's Command,
Law's Brigade, Hood's Division,

Colonel E.M. Law, 4th Alabama, Commanding,
Organization.
4th Alabama Infantry, 2nd Mississippi Infantry, 6th North Carolina Infantry, 11th Mississippi Infantry.
(September 17, 1862.)

Law's Brigade advanced from the woods at the Dunkard Church at 7 a.m., and relieved Trimble's Brigade across the Smoketown Road south of this point. Gradually gaining ground to the left, of it center on open ground and its right in the East Woods, it assisted in repulsing the advance of Rickett's Division, First Corps. Supported on the right by the 21st Georgia of Trimble's Brigade and the 5th Texas of Wofford's Brigade, it advanced to the northeast corner of Miller's cornfield and the woods adjacent, from which it was dislodged by the Advance of the Twelfth Corps. It withdrew to the fields south of the Dunkard Church and was not again engaged.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 330.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.868′ N, 77° 44.597′ W. Marker is in Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County.
Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Longstreet's Command Marker
Marker is on Cornfield Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located between stops three and four of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sixth Army Corps (a few steps from this marker); First New Jersey Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 13th New Jersey Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery B (within shouting distance of this marker); First Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named First Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Batlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Law's Brigade. In his official report, Law would write, "The good conduct of my brigade in this battle
Cornfield Avenue Looking West image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Cornfield Avenue Looking West
Further east from the artillery display, War Department Tablets 339 (on the left) and 102 (on the right) detail actions at different phases of the fight for the East Woods and the cornfield.
had not been surpassed by it in any previous engagement. Weak and exhausted as they were, and fighting against fearful odds, the troops accomplished and endured all that was within the limits of human capacity."
(Submitted on February 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Evander M. Law. Evander McIver Law (August 7, 1836 – October 31, 1920) was an author, teacher, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Longstreet's Command Marker
Brig. General Evander M. Law (1836-1920) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Brig. General Evander M. Law (1836-1920)
At the Battle of Antietam, Law's Brigade defended against the Union attack through the Cornfield at high cost—454 killed and wounded.
East Half of the Cornfield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. East Half of the Cornfield
From a point about midway down Cornfield Avenue, looking to the north. The cornfield's historical boundary is to the north of the snake rail fence. As Law's Brigade advanced to the north here and the attack gained momentum, they struck the Federal lines to the east of the rock ledge that bisected the cornfield. One regiment of Wofford's Texas Brigade, the 5th Texas, supported Law's Brigade on the right (to the east). The rest of Wofford's Brigade attacked on the west side of the rock ledge. Thus the two brigade attacks in this phase of the battle were divided by the terrain.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 676 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on February 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 22, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on February 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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