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Clarksburg in Harrison County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Clarksburg Defenses

Protecting the Town and Railroad

 

—Jones-Imboden Raid —

 
Clarksburg Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 1, 2012
1. Clarksburg Defenses Marker
Inscription. On April 20, 1863, Confederate Gens. William E. “Grumble” Jones and John D. Imboden began a raid from Virginia through present-day West Virginia against the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Taking separate routes, they later reported that they marched 1,100 miles, fought several engagements, captured 100 Federals, seized about 1,200 horses and 4,000 cattle, and burned 4 turnpike bridges, more than 20 railroad bridges, 2 trains, and 150,000 barrels of oil. Most bridges were soon repaired. Confederate losses were slight. By May 26, both commands had returned to Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley.

The trenches here and on Pinnicinick Hill were constructed for the protection of Clarksburg and the vital North Western Virginia Railroad. The line ran west from Grafton, where it joined the Baltimore an Ohio Railroad, through Clarksburg to Parkersburg. On May 30, 1861, three companies of the 14th Ohio Infantry arrived in Clarksburg by train from Ohio, the first Union troops to do so. The 8th Indiana Infantry soon arrived and on Jun 19 began to help build fortifications on Lowndes and Pinnicinick Hills.The soldiers did not live in the trenches but rather in camps in town. One of the camps was in the current Glen Elk area and another was in the area of the Odd Fellows Cemetery on Chestnut Street.

When in
Clarksburg Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 1, 2012
2. Clarksburg Defenses Marker
April 1863 Confederate Gen. William E. “Grumble” Jones and Gen. John D Imboden raided present-day West Virginia, Jones approached Clarksburg from the north and Imboden from the east. Approximately 5,000 Union troops in the area retreated to the relative safety of Clarksburg’s fortifications. The commanding general, Benjamin S. Roberts, sent out a cavalry company on a reconnaissance but otherwise made no effort to attack the Confederates. Jones, finding the defenses of Clarksburg too strong, moved on to Bridgeport, where his men burned two railroad bridges and destroyed a locomotive.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 16.5′ N, 80° 20.418′ W. Marker is in Clarksburg, West Virginia, in Harrison County. Marker is on Kiwanis Drive. Touch for map. The marker is located in Lowndes Park. Marker is in this post office area: Clarksburg WV 26301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S.S. West Virginia Bow Flag Staff (approx. 0.3 miles away); Union Meetings (approx. 0.3 miles away); Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson Monument (approx. 0.3
Clarksburg Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 1, 2012
3. Clarksburg Defenses Marker
miles away); "Stonewall" Jackson (approx. 0.3 miles away); Clarksburg (approx. 0.3 miles away); Combat Wounded (approx. 0.3 miles away); Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson Birthplace (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Immigrants (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clarksburg.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Clarksburg Defenses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 1, 2012
4. Clarksburg Defenses Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 393 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 24, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   3. submitted on September 1, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4. submitted on September 10, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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