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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps

 
 
Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps Marker
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps,

Brig. Gen. James B. Ricketts, Commanding.
September 17, 1862.

Ricketts’ Division, on the left of the First Corps, formed for attack at 6 a.m., in the following order: Hartsuff’s Brigade in advance, supported by Christian’s Brigade on the left and Duryea’s Brigade on the right. The division advanced to the west edge of the East Woods and along the south edge of the Cornfield, where it became heavily engaged with the enemy.

It maintained itself in this position for some time but, its ammunition having been exhausted, it was eventually obliged to withdraw. After replenishing its supply of ammunition, it was formed, in reserve, in the fields east of the Hagerstown Pike and remained there throughout the day.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 29.221′ N, 77° 44.658′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Mansfield Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located past stop two of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield,
Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps Marker
on a section of Mansfield Avenue which runs into the East Woods. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 8th Regt. Pennsylvania Reserver Volunteer Corps (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Army Corps (about 800 feet away); Meade's Division, First Army Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Meade's Division, First Army Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away); 3rd Regt. Pennsylvania (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named First Army Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1st Corps, 3rd Division, 2nd Brigade Bivouac (approx. 0.2 miles away); 4th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Culmination of Another Great Tragedy was at Hand (approx. 0.2 miles away); Twelfth Army Corps (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Regarding Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps. This marker is included on the East Woods Virtual Tour by Markers see the Virtual tour link below to see the markers in sequence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
3. Ricketts' Division, First Army Corps Marker
The directional sign to the right points out the division's location on the night of September 16.
 

2. 2nd Division, I Corps. (Submitted on March 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. East Woods Virtual Tour by Markers. A collection of markers interpreting the action of during the Battle of Antietam around the East Woods. (Submitted on March 8, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. James B. Ricketts. James Brewerton Ricketts (June 21, 1817 – September 22, 1887) was a career officer in the United States Army, serving as a Union Army general during the Civil War. (Submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Ricketts’ Division, First Army Corps Marker
Major General James Brewerton Ricketts (1817-1887) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Major General James Brewerton Ricketts (1817-1887)
At the Battle of Antietam, he had two horses killed under him and he was badly injured when the second one fell on him.
Ricketts' Division Advance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Ricketts' Division Advance
Looking northeast from the marker location, Duryee's Brigade advanced across the fields here brushing the northern limits of the East Woods. Hartsuff's Brigade was to the right, further east.
Duryee Advances to the Cornfield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
7. Duryee Advances to the Cornfield
Duryee's Brigade continued to the southwest across these open fields and entered the eastern side of the cornfield. The barn in the left center is not from the time of the battle, but stands just south of Cornfield Avenue. Duryee's advance stopped about half way from the camera to that point.
Christian's and Hartsuff's Brigades image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
8. Christian's and Hartsuff's Brigades
Here at the point where Mansfield Avenue turns back to the east, on the northeast boundary of the East Woods is where Christian's and Hartsuff's Brigades advanced toward the eastern edge of the cornfield. At the time of the battle, this open ground was wooded.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 864 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on March 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 25, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8. submitted on March 3, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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