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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Appomattox Court House in Appomattox County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Clover Hill Tavern

 
 
Clover Hill Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. Clover Hill Tavern
Inscription. Built in 1819, this was the first building in what would become the village of Appomattox Court House. The Clover Hill Tavern served travelers along the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road. For several decades, it offered the village’s only restaurant, only overnight lodging, and only bar. Its presence helped prompt the Virginia legislature to locate the Appomattox County seat here. In 1846, the courthouse was built across the street.

By 1865, the tavern had come on hard times – a “bare and cheerless place,” according to one Union general. It was one of only two buildings in town used by the Federal army during the surrender process. Here, on the evening of April 10, 1865, Union soldiers set up printing presses and started producing paroles for the surrendered Confederates. The Federals printed more than 30,000 parole documents here.
 
Erected by Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, National Park Service.
 
Location. 37° 22.673′ N, 78° 47.757′ W. Marker is in Appomattox Court House, Virginia, in Appomattox County. Marker can be reached from State Highway 24, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located in Appomattox Court House National Historical Park across
Clover Hill Tavern with Marker on the Fence to the Right image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
2. Clover Hill Tavern with Marker on the Fence to the Right
from the court house/Visitors Center. Located along the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road, which is now a walking path. Marker is in this post office area: Appomattox VA 24522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. County Jail (within shouting distance of this marker); McLean House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); April 1865 (about 600 feet away); Appomattox Court House (about 600 feet away); Last Artillery Shots (about 800 feet away); Final Combat (about 800 feet away); The Surrender Ceremony (about 800 feet away); Tibbs Lane (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Appomattox Court House.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker features a photograph with the caption The tavern as it appeared in 1865. The wing to the left housed the dining room, the structure to the right the bar. Both no longer stand.
 
Also see . . .  Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. (Submitted on March 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Notable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
Clover Hill Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
3. Clover Hill Tavern
Inside the Clover Hill Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
4. Inside the Clover Hill Tavern
After the surrender, printing presses were set up inside the Clover Hill Tavern. These were used to produce paroles for the Confederates soldiers.
Tavern Kitchen image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
5. Tavern Kitchen
The tavern's kitchen now serves as the park bookstore. It stands to the northwest of the tavern.
Slave Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
6. Slave Quarters
The slave quarters stand just north (behind) the tavern.
Inside the Clover Hill Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
7. Inside the Clover Hill Tavern
More printing equipment in the Clover Hill Tavern.
Appomattox County Court House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
8. Appomattox County Court House
The Clover Hill Tavern is located in the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, across from the court house/Visitors Center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,905 times since then and 123 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on April 25, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on March 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6. submitted on April 25, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8. submitted on March 5, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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