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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlestown in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Yard as Home

 
 
The Yard as Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
1. The Yard as Home Marker
Inscription. Thousands of civilians spent their work days in the yard, then returned home to their Boston neighborhoods. For a few naval personnel, however; the yard was both a work-place and a home. For those who lived here, whether in the luxurious Commandant's House on the hill, the elegant officers's quarters to your left, or the spartan Marine Barracks on the hill to your right, the navy yard became their "community."
 
Erected by Boston National Historical Park-Charlestown Navy Yard- National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 42° 22.448′ N, 71° 3.353′ W. Marker is in Charlestown, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker is on 1st. Avenue. Touch for map. The Yard as Home and Working in the Yard Markers are side by side in front of large anchors. Marker is in this post office area: Charlestown MA 02129, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Working in the Yard (here, next to this marker); Boston, the Navy Yard, and the War of 1812 (a few steps from this marker); Charlestown Navy Yard (within shouting distance of this marker); The Changing Yard (within shouting distance of this
The Yard as Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
2. The Yard as Home Marker
The markers "The Yard as Home" and Working in the yard" can be seen in the background of Boston, The Navy Yard, and the War of 1812, marker.
marker); "Old Ironsides" in Dry Dock 1 (within shouting distance of this marker); Serving the Fleet (within shouting distance of this marker); Dry Dock 1 (within shouting distance of this marker); Boston Naval Shipyard (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlestown.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made Features
 
Officers' Row 1882 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
3. Officers' Row 1882
In 1833, the Navy built a row of five housed for master tradesmen. These warrant officers, such as the master sailmaker and the master carpenter; managed the principal shops of the yard for the commandant. Today these houses are private residences for National Park Service and Navy families.
The porch of the Commandant's House in the 1960s, facing the yard. image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
4. The porch of the Commandant's House in the 1960s, facing the yard.
Marine Barracks in the 1860s image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
5. Marine Barracks in the 1860s
Built in 1805, the house on the hill was a home for the commandant of the yard and his family. For 170 years, the 14-room mansion was also the scene of local, national, and international receptions. Today the house continues to host receptions and special events.
Commandant's House 1852 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
6. Commandant's House 1852
Built in 1805, the house on the hill was a home for the commandant of the yard and his family. For 170 years, the 14-room mansion was also the scene of local, national, and international receptions. Today the house continues to host receptions and special events.
Sleeping quarters in the Marine Barracks in 1850. image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
7. Sleeping quarters in the Marine Barracks in 1850.
The Marine Corps enforced law and provided security for the yard. Over the years the detachment varied from 15 marines to its World War II strength of 600 marines.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 231 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on October 7, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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