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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlestown in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Working in the Yard

 
 
Working in the Yard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
1. Working in the Yard Marker
Inscription. When the Charleston Navy Yard opened in 1800, Boston 's skilled maritime workers provided a ready source of labor. As sail gave way to steam, and wooden hulls gave way to iron and steel, the work of building, repairing, and maintaining a fleet changed with modern technology.

The size of the work forced also changed, varying with war, peace, and the size of the fleet. During World War II, more than 50,000 full-time employees worked round-the-clock in such specialized jobs as ship fitter, boilermaker, and foundry worker.
 
Erected by Boston National Historical Park Charlestown Navy Yard-National Park Service US Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 42° 22.45′ N, 71° 3.351′ W. Marker is in Charlestown, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker is on 1st. Street. Touch for map. Next to marker the yard is home. Marker is in this post office area: Charlestown MA 02129, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Yard as Home (here, next to this marker); Boston, the Navy Yard, and the War of 1812 (a few steps from this marker); "Old Ironsides" in Dry Dock 1 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Changing Yard

Shift changing during World War II. The portal over Gate 1 was demolished after the war. image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
2. Shift changing during World War II. The portal over Gate 1 was demolished after the war.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Charlestown Navy Yard (within shouting distance of this marker); Serving the Fleet (within shouting distance of this marker); Dry Dock 1 (within shouting distance of this marker); Boston Naval Shipyard (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlestown.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWar, World II
 
Supplying the ships. (above left) Workers produced rope in the quarter-mile-long Ropewalk, built in image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
3. Supplying the ships. (above left) Workers produced rope in the quarter-mile-long Ropewalk, built in
(Above, Right) In 1926, navy yard workers invented die-lock anchor chain in the Chain Forge.
The Muster House. image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
4. The Muster House.
Until the 1890s, employees gathered three times daily at the octagonal Muster House.
Women welders in 1943. image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
5. Women welders in 1943.
During World War II, as more and more men left for combat, women took over positions traditionally held by men, including welders, riveters, and machinists. We all felt that we were doing our job, and the harder we worked, the faster we would get the ship out, and the faster (the war) would get over. Gloria Brandenberg Shipyard Painter, World War Ii
Anchor behind Working in the Yard and the yard is home image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 13, 2012
6. Anchor behind Working in the Yard and the yard is home
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 240 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 7, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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