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White Hall in Lowndes County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Holy Ground Battlefield

 
 
Holy Ground Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 12, 2012
1. Holy Ground Battlefield Marker
Inscription. Six miles North, on December 23, 1813, General F.L. Claiborne's army defeated the Creeks and destroyed the Holy Ground Indian Village. One American was killed and 33 Creeks. William "Red Eagle" Weatherford escaped by leaping on horseback into the river and swimming across. This defeat closed the Creek military operations in South Alabama and facilitated General Jackson's victory at Horseshoe Bend.
 
Erected 1975 by The Society of the War of 1812 in Alabama.
 
Location. 32° 16.179′ N, 86° 43.488′ W. Marker is in White Hall, Alabama, in Lowndes County. Marker is at the intersection of Freedom Road (County Road 23) and U.S. 80, on the right when traveling north on Freedom Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Freedom Road, Hayneville AL 36040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Campsite 2 (approx. 1.1 miles away); Mount Gillard Baptist Church (approx. 1.3 miles away); Viola Liuzzo (approx. 4.8 miles away); Lowndesboro (approx. 6.7 miles away); Lowndesboro, Alabama/Lowndesboro Business District
Holy Ground Battlefield Marker (Marker Repainted/Replaced) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 27, 2013
2. Holy Ground Battlefield Marker (Marker Repainted/Replaced)
(approx. 6.8 miles away); Our Confederate Soldiers (approx. 7.1 miles away); Elmore Bolling (approx. 7.9 miles away); Talisi visited by De Soto (approx. 9.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in White Hall.
 
Regarding Holy Ground Battlefield. the Creek War of 1813-1814. The famed Red Stick village of Holy Ground stood on a bluff overlooking the Alabama River just ten miles northwest of Lowndesboro. It was here that the Prophet Josiah Francis spearheaded a nativistic religious movement that swept through the Creek Nation in the years 1811-1814.The followers of Francis formed a powerful division in the Creek Nation called the Red Sticks, because they displayed red war clubs in their towns. They launched a civil war against the Big Warrior and other traditional leaders of the Nation. The war exploded into an all out conflict with the whites when a party of Mississippi Territorial Militia attacked a Red Stick supply party at Burnt Corn Spring in 1813. The Red Sticks retaliated by destroying Fort Mims and killing hundreds of men, women and children.

The outbreak led to attacks on the Creek Nation by three different U.S. armies. On December 23, 1813, the
Holy Ground Battlefield Marker, near U.S. 80, (State Route 8) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 12, 2012
3. Holy Ground Battlefield Marker, near U.S. 80, (State Route 8)
army of Gen. F.L. Claiborne fought and won the Battle of Holy Ground, destroying the center of the Prophet's movement and beginning the ultimate near destruction of the Red Sticks.(ExploreSouthernHistory.com; Lowndesboro, Alabama)
 
Also see . . .
1. American Archaeology - The Story Of Holy Ground: Investigating A Legendary Battle Site. Summer 2016 Issue of American Archaeology, Vol. 20 No. 1. (Submitted on January 17, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.) 

2. The Battle of Horseshoe Bend, Wikipedia entry. was fought during the War of 1812 in central Alabama. On March 27, 1814, United States forces and Indian allies under Major General Andrew Jackson defeated the Red Sticks, a part of the Creek Indian tribe who opposed American expansion, effectively ending the Creek War. (Submitted on November 3, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Holy Ground Battlefield Park. (Submitted on November 3, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
4. Biography of William Weatherford, a.k.a. Red Eagle, GenealogyForum.com. ... He was the son of Charles Weatherford -- a Scottish trader and an Indian Princess of the Wind Clan of the Creek Nation ... William Weatherford became a leader of the "red sticks" and led the raid on Fort Mims in which over 500 whites were killed. General Andrew Jackson fought Red Eagle's people near Talladega, Alabama and killed many Indians. Davey Crocket
Area view of repainted Holy Ground Battlefield Marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, December 27, 2013
4. Area view of repainted Holy Ground Battlefield Marker.
was with General Jackson during this fight. (Submitted on November 3, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Wars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 30, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 882 times since then and 117 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 2, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on August 3, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   3. submitted on November 2, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on August 4, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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