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Central in Washington County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Mountain Meadows Massacre

 
 
Mountain Meadows Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Chris English, February 11, 2012
1. Mountain Meadows Massacre Marker
Inscription.
Massacre of Men and Boys
On September 11, 1857, a procession of Arkansas emigrants bound for California marched northward up this valley having been persuaded to leave their beseiged camp by Mormon militiamen, bearing a white flag, who falsely promised them protection. As directed by the militia leaders, the women, children and wounded left the camp first. The men and older boys were last to leave, each escorted by a militiaman. As the men neared this spot, a signal was given. The militiamen at their sides turned and fired upon the unarmed emigrant men and older boys. Within minutes all were dead, their bodies strewn near the wagon road. Further up the road, the women, children and wounded who had traveled ahead were also murdered. Only 17 children, aged six and under, survived.

Burials
This ground has traditionally been associated with the burials of the men and boys killed nearby. On the day following the massacre, Mormon militia members hastily buried the victims in shallow graves near where they fell. However, within days, wolves and coyotes had pulled the bodies from the earth. Local ranchers, a federal Indian agent, and soldiers reburied many bones in 1858 and 1859. Small rock cairns once marked the sites of some of the burials, but the stones are now mostly scattered. One of these
Mountain Meadows Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Chris English, February 11, 2012
2. Mountain Meadows Massacre Marker
stones, with a cross on its face, has been incorporated into the memorial. For more than a century, this ground has lain untilled and protected from desecration by its owners out of respect for those who died in the massacre and are buried in the vicinity.
 
Erected by Maintained by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in cooperation with relatives of the victims.
 
Location. 37° 29.267′ N, 113° 37.821′ W. Marker is in Central, Utah, in Washington County. Marker is on Utah Route 18 at milepost 31, on the left. Touch for map. This monument is clearly signed on Utah 18 and is approximately .5 mile N of the turnoff for the Mountain Meadow Memorial turnoff. Marker is in this post office area: Central UT 84722, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 1990 Mountain Meadows Monument (approx. mile away); The Old Spanish Trail and The California Road (approx. mile away); a different marker also named The Mountain Meadows Massacre (approx. mile away); The Burial Sites (approx. mile away); Mountain Meadows Massacre Grave Site Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); American Legion Hiatt-Hunt Post 80
Never to be Forgotten Memorial at the Site image. Click for full size.
By Chris English
3. Never to be Forgotten Memorial at the Site
In memory of the emigrant men and boys from Arkansas massacred here in Mountain Meadows on September 11,1857. Their lives were taken prematurely and wrongly by Mormon militiamen in one of the most tragic episodes in western American history.

May we forever remember and honor those buried in this valley. May we never forget this tragedy but learn from the past.
(approx. 7.2 miles away); Hannah Louise Leavitt Terry (approx. 7.2 miles away); Eliza Jane Pulsipher Terry (approx. 7.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Central.
 
More about this marker. There is a gravel road and parking lot for this monument.
 
Regarding Mountain Meadows Massacre. I've met two descendents of the Paiute tribal members who watched from nearby ridges as the described events unfolded. One was a college student from San Diego, California. The other a heavy equuipment operator from Caliente, Nevada.
 
Also see . . .
1. A Bibliographic Perspective by Newell G. Bringhurst. (Submitted on November 6, 2012, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.)
2. The Mountain Meadows Massacre. This Wikipedia article gives a detailed account of the incident and provides an extensive list of references for further research. In addition many historical photos are provided. (Submitted on November 8, 2012, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & Settlers
 
Never to be Forgotten Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Chris English
4. Never to be Forgotten Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2012, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. This page has been viewed 508 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 6, 2012, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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