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Alpine in Brewster County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

First Baptist Church of Alpine

 
 
First Baptist Church of Alpine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
1. First Baptist Church of Alpine Marker
Inscription. When the railroad came through this area in 1882, the settlement of Osborne was established here near natural springs. The community's name changed to Murphysville in 1883, and at that time, as the population began to grow, missionaries arrived from numerous denominations. Included among them was the noted Rev. George W. Baines. In 1883, he held what was reportedly the first Protestant meeting in the community, which became known as Alpine in 1888.

Ten years after Baines' meeting, the First Baptist Church of Alpine was officially organized on April 14, 1893. It called its first pastor, the Rev. D.B. Rose, in 1894. That same year, the church affiliated with the Sweetwater Association, and the congregation met in various locations until purchasing this site and dedicating its first sanctuary, an adobe structure, here in 1896. The congregation by that time had a Women's Missionary Union and held regular Bible and Sunday School classes. Membership increased, and next to its sanctuary in 1910, the congregation added a parsonage.

The church grew, with nearly two hundred members enrolled in Sunday School and youth and service groups. In 1915, it began work on a larger sanctuary, in use by 1917. Architect James E. Greene's design included ample sanctuary seating, as well as Sunday School rooms, a baptistery, a Ladies Aid
First Baptist Church of Alpine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
2. First Baptist Church of Alpine Marker
parlor and a pastor's study.

The congregation added facilities and expanded its programs to meet the needs of the community, including the Sul Ross Teachers College, which opened in 1920. With no local public library, members established a borrowing library. Other programs included children's and youth programs, Boy Scout sponsorship, mission work in Alpine and in Mexico, and activities at Sul Ross State University. Participating in Baptist work locally and internationally, First Baptist Church continues to lead its local and regional communities through its many programs, services and dedicated members.
 
Erected 2003 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 12989.)
 
Location. 30° 21.561′ N, 103° 39.663′ W. Marker is in Alpine, Texas, in Brewster County. Marker is at the intersection of North 4th Street and East Sul Ross Avenue, on the left when traveling north on North 4th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 203 North 4th Street, Alpine TX 79830, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gage-Van Sickle (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Nolte-Rooney House (about 600 feet away); J.C. Carr-Bob Slight House
First Baptist Church of Alpine image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
3. First Baptist Church of Alpine
(about 700 feet away); Colonel Henry P. Brewster (about 700 feet away); Our Pioneers (about 700 feet away); 105 Howitzer (about 700 feet away); This Enduring Monument (about 700 feet away); Brewster County Courthouse (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alpine.
 
Also see . . .  First Baptist Church of Alpine. (Submitted on November 13, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 11, 2012, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 281 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 11, 2012, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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