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Unionville in Talbot County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Unionville

Founded to Honor their Service

 
 
Unionville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 25, 2012
1. Unionville Marker
Inscription. From the beginning of the Civil War, Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman urged President Abraham Lincoln to allow blacks to enlist in the U.S. Army and fight for their freedom. On May 22, 1863, General Orders 143 were issued stating "A Bureau is established ... for the record of all matters related to the organization of Colored Troops." The Orders were a major turning point in the war for the Union and changed America's fate.

Eighteen Talbot County slaves and free blacks joined the U.S. Colored Troops. At least half of them were assigned to the Seventh Regiment Infantry which fought in some of the war's most crucial battles. The regiment was repeatedly praised for its performance as it was by a New York Tribune correspondent who wrote after the battle at Fussels Mills, "The 7th U.S. colored troops (Maryland) on the first day carried with fixed bayonets, a line of rifle pits, and carried it without a shot, but with a loss of thirty-five; it was one of the most stirring and gallant affairs I have ever known."

In 1866, the soldiers were discharged and returned to their families here. John and Ezekiel Cowgill, conscientious Quakers who owned Lombardy Plantation, offered each veteran a plot of land and a dollar a month. The former soldiers immediately built a school and church and named their new community Cowgilltown.
Headstone of John Copper, Company B, 19th United States Colored Infantry image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 25, 2012
2. Headstone of John Copper, Company B, 19th United States Colored Infantry
in the church yard behind St. Stephens A.M.E. Church Unionville.
Later, they renamed the village Unionville to honor their service during the Civil War. The eighteen veterans and founders of Unionville are buried here behind St. Stephen A.M.E. Church.
 
Location. 38° 48.566′ N, 76° 8.371′ W. Marker is in Unionville, Maryland, in Talbot County. Marker is on Unionville Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. In the parking lot north of of St. Stephens A.M.E. Church in Unionville. Marker is in this post office area: Easton MD 21601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Union Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Unionville (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of “The Rest” (approx. 1.5 miles away); Betty’s Cove Meetinghouse (approx. 2.2 miles away); Fausley (approx. 3 miles away); The “Mannour of Ratcliffe” (approx. 3.2 miles away); Bracing for an Attack (approx. 3.8 miles away); Talbot County Courthouse (approx. 4.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Unionville.
 
More about this marker. The Civil War Trails marker is next to a copy of the Union Soldiers marker which is south of the church.
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Unionville Marker and a copy of the Union Soldiers marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 25, 2012
3. Unionville Marker and a copy of the Union Soldiers marker
Unionville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 25, 2012
4. Unionville Marker
The Gates of Lombardy Plantation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 25, 2012
5. The Gates of Lombardy Plantation
Back of copy Union Soldiers marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 25, 2012
6. Back of copy Union Soldiers marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 26, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 390 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 26, 2012, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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