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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salem in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Narbonne House

Salem Maritime National Historical Site

 

—National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
Narbonne House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 2, 2010
1. Narbonne House Marker
Left side of the marker
Inscription. Salem Maritime National Historic Site-The modest house in front of you is one of the oldest in Salem. Built here in 1672, the Narbonne House is also one of America’s few surviving middle-class homes of the 1600s.

The builder and first owner was a”slaughterer,” or butcher, Later, residents included a weaver, a shoreman, a tanner, and several seamen. One of the last owners was Sarah Narbonne, a seamstress, who operated a tiny “Cent Shop” in the lean-to on the side of the house. Their lives have all left traces, which recent archeological investigations have brought to light.

By 1760, a small brick-floored dairy in the backyard kept milk and cheese cool. Between 1780 and 1820, prosperous owners put up a handsome carriage house and narrowed the lean-to so a carriage could get past it.

In the 1870s, when the house hooked into city water mains, residents began filling their outmoded backyard wells with discards and trash. In all, the Narbonne lot has yielded more than 142,000 artifacts of middle-class in Salem.

Narbonne House in 1913 (photo to the right): 1. Original home (1672). 2. Gambrel-roof addition (1730s). 3. Lean-to (ca. 1800). 4. Carriage House (demolished 1965).
 
Location. 42° 31.349′ N, 70° 53.236′ W. Marker

Narbonne House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 2, 2010
2. Narbonne House Marker
Right side of the marker. Narbonne House in 1913 (photo to the right): 1. Original home (1672). 2. Gambrel-roof addition (1730s). 3. Lean-to (ca. 1800). 4. Carriage House (demolished 1965). (Top of the right side of the marker) The backbone of Maritime Massachusetts, however was its middle class; the captains and mates of vessels, the master builders and shipwrights, the rope-makers, and skilled mechanics of many trades, without whom the merchants were nothing.-Samuel Eliot Morison, Maritime History of Massachusetts 1921. (Left Photo) Sarah Narbonne in her front room in 1888. She died two years later in her 95th year. (Above photo) Discarded household goods included many everyday wares, as well as some high-quality ceramics.
is in Salem, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker is on Essex Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 71 Essex Street, Salem MA 01970, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Privateer Warehouse (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Derby House (about 300 feet away); Home for Aged Women (about 400 feet away); The Custom House (about 400 feet away); Derby Wharf (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Derby Wharf (about 400 feet away but has been reported missing); Central Wharf (about 500 feet away); Salem Maritime National Historic Site (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salem.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Buildings
 
Narbonne House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 2, 2010
3. Narbonne House Marker
Path to the Narbonne House
Narbonne House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 2, 2010
4. Narbonne House Marker
Path to the Narbonne House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 11, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 239 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 11, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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