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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Baltimore Battery

 
 
The Baltimore Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
1. The Baltimore Battery Marker
Inscription.
The Baltimore Battery (Confederate) fired from this spot into the Union forces in the Cornfield. It included a 12-pounder iron howitzer (like the small gun before you), the only one of its kind among the 500 cannon at Antietam.
 
Location. 39° 28.676′ N, 77° 44.999′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Dunker Church Road / Old Hagerstown Pike, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop five of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield, near an artillery display. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Baltimore Battery ( a few steps from this marker); Brockenbrough’s 2nd Baltimore, Maryland Battery ( a few steps from this marker); Jackson's Command ( a few steps from this marker); Longstreet's Command ( within shouting distance of this marker); The Onward Rush to Victory or Defeat ( within shouting distance of this marker); "Back Boys, For God's Sake Move Back;" ( within shouting distance of this marker);
The Baltimore Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. The Baltimore Battery Marker
Philadelphia Brigade Park ( about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Philadelphia Brigade Monument ( about 300 feet away); Brigadier General William E. Starke ( about 400 feet away); 3rd Delaware Infantry ( about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. The Baltimore Battery. The battery had four guns at the time of the battle, of a varied sort - one 3-inch Ordnance Rifle (captured from the Federals), one 2.9-inch Parrott Rifle (also capture), a 12-pounder Blakely rifle (imported from England), and a 12-pounder field howitzer. Other sources dispute the presence of the Parrott rifle and mention two Blakely rifles. (Submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Baltimore Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
3. The Baltimore Battery Marker
The Baltimore Battery Location image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
4. The Baltimore Battery Location
The metal marker stands between the artillery pieces. The Baltimore Battery monument stands to the right.
The Baltimore Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
5. The Baltimore Battery Marker
12-pounder Iron Field Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
6. 12-pounder Iron Field Howitzer
Most of the 12-pounders used at the battle were bronze. Iron was shunned after the 1830s for manufacture of smoothbore field artillery due to inconsistencies in the metal (but was used in the construction of larger garrison weapons). Faced with bronze shortages early in the war, many Confederate sources turned to iron again. The particular example here is noteworthy for both the metal used and the design. Unlike other field howitzers in this caliber, there is no "step" at the reinforce. Instead the barrel gradually blends into the reinforce, which expands to nearly a foot in diameter. The manufacture and source of this piece is unknown, and no markings are visible. It is possible but unlikely that this weapon was used by the Baltimore Battery.
Baltimore Battery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 1976
7. Baltimore Battery
12-Pound Iron Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
8. 12-Pound Iron Howitzer
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 956 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on October 16, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on October 16, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on April 5, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8. submitted on October 16, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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