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Wentworth in Rockingham County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Wentworth Methodist Church

The Price of War

 
 
Wentworth Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
1. Wentworth Methodist Church Marker
Inscription.
Wentworth Methodist Church was organized in 1836, and the present sanctuary was constructed in 1859. It contains a slave gallery and is the last antebellum Methodist church building in Rockingham County. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

Slaves and free blacks are buried in the cemetery behind the church, as well as members of the predominantly white congregation. Obelisks mark the graves of George D. Boyd and three of his sons who died in Confederate service. Capt. John H. Boyd, Co. I, 21st North Carolina Infantry, died in Richmond, Virginia, in 1861. Lt. George F. Boyd, Co. E, 45th North Carolina Infantry, was killed in 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg. Capt. Samuel H. Boyd, also of Co. E, later was promoted to colonel and was killed at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia, in 1864. A fourth brother, Lt. Col. Andrew J. Boyd of the 45th North Carolina Infantry and later of the 22nd Battalion North Carolina Home Guard, survived the war and settled in Reidsville, where he died and is buried.

Other officers and soldiers are interred here. Lt. E. Wheeler Hancock, who served in the Mexican War, became colonel of the 77th Regiment, North Carolina Senior Reserves, during the Civil War. Surgeon John R. Raine served in the 45th North Carolina Infantry. Lt. John P. Ellington, 72nd
Wentworth Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
2. Wentworth Methodist Church Marker
The Methodist Church can be seen behind the marker.
Regiment, North Carolina Junior Reserves, drowned near Fort Fisher. Capt. Berry J. Law, a native of England, served in the 69th Regiment, North Carolina Home Guard.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 24.051′ N, 79° 46.609′ W. Marker is in Wentworth, North Carolina, in Rockingham County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 65 and Hearthstone Trail, on the right when traveling east on State Highway 65. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wentworth NC 27375, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Wentworth Methodist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Wentworth and the War (approx. 0.3 miles away); Wright Tavern (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stephen A. Douglas (approx. 4.6 miles away); Lower Saura Town (approx. 5.1 miles away); Dan River (approx. 5.9 miles away); Leaksville Landing (approx. 5.9 miles away); “River boat Men: Dan River, 1792 – 1892” (approx. 6.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wentworth.
 
More about this marker.
Wentworth Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
3. Wentworth Methodist Church Marker
A photograph of the Wentworth Methodist Church and Cemetery circa 1900 appears at the lower right of the marker.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Wentworth Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
4. Wentworth Methodist Church Marker
Wentworth Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
5. Wentworth Methodist Church
This building is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Graves of George D. Boyd and His Sons image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, February 4, 2013
6. Graves of George D. Boyd and His Sons
As mentioned on the marker, George Boyd and his three sons who died during the Civil War are buried behind the Wentworth Methodist Church.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 6, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 304 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 6, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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