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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vienna in Dorchester County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Discover: The Nanticoke

 
 
Discover: The Nanticoke Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 9, 2013
1. Discover: The Nanticoke Marker
Inscription. In 1608, English Captain John Smith's explorations of the Chesapeake Bay led him up the Nanticoke River. He may have felt as if he were exploring the New World, but the Native Americans he encountered had been living in the region for millennia. The Nanticokes, as they came to be called, were the largest group on Maryland's Eastern Shore at the time.

The Nanticokes were governed by a paramount chief whose main town, north of Vienna, became known as Chicone. As the number of colonists increased, European practices conflicted with age-old native traditions. In 1698, the Chicone Indian Reservation was established by 70 years later was disbanded as many of its inhabitants had moved away. Today some descendants of the native people continue to live in the region.
 
Location. 38° 28.982′ N, 75° 49.402′ W. Marker is in Vienna, Maryland, in Dorchester County. Marker is on Water Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker at the north end of the park along Water Street. Marker is in this post office area: Vienna MD 21869, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Discover: Vienna (here, next to this marker); John Smith Explores the Chesapeake (approx. 0.2
Discover: The Nanticoke Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 9, 2013
2. Discover: The Nanticoke Marker
miles away); Discover: Vienna Heritage (approx. 0.2 miles away); Unnacokossimmon (approx. 0.4 miles away); The African American Story in the Indian Town (approx. 1.9 miles away); The native people of the Chicacone Village...the Nanticokes (approx. 1.9 miles away); Handsell (approx. 1.9 miles away); The Nanticoke Historic Preservation Alliance (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vienna.
 
Also see . . .  John Smith shallop to stop at Vienna. From the Star Democrat, Wednesday, May 30, 2007 (Submitted on February 14, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative Americans
 
Captain John Smith's Voyages image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 9, 2013
3. Captain John Smith's Voyages
English Captain John Smith left Jamestown, Virginia, in 1608 to explore the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. He made his first journey with 14 crew members in a 28-foot, open boat, called a shallop.
Re-Enactors image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 9, 2013
4. Re-Enactors
In 2007, re-enactors retraced John Smith's route in a replica boat, sailing up the Nanticoke River and stopping in Vienna.
Native Americans image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 9, 2013
5. Native Americans
Native Americans relied on the river and its marshes for an abundant supply of fish, shellfish, game and edible plants, and cultivated small plots of corn and beans.

Today, Native Americans hold an annual festival in Vienna to participate in local heritage events.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 14, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 241 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 14, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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