Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District, Israel
 

The Egyptian Governor's Residence

 
 
The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
1. The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker
Inscription. This is the most complete of the six Late Bronze Age (Canaanite), 1550-1200 B.C.E. palaces excavated at Afeq. The ground floor is preserved in its entirety, while the stairway testifies to the existence of the now-destroyed upper storeys.
Inscriptions in Sumerian, Akkadian and Canaanite languages found in the palace be a witness to the importance of Afeq in the Egyptian government network in Canaan. A letter from Ugarit (in northern Syria) is evidence of the trade between the Egyptian and Hittite empires that passed through this region.
Canaanite Afeq and the Egyptian governor's residence were destroyed in a fierce battle ca. 1230 B.C.E. Archaeological excavations uncovered layers of burnt bricks and ash from the collapsed upper floors, as well as arrow-heads still embedded in the walls of the palace.
 
Location. 32° 6.314′ N, 34° 55.795′ E. Marker is near Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District. Marker can be reached from Yarkon Park Entrance Roadway just north of National Route 483. Touch for map. This historical marker is located in the interior of Yarkon Park, inside of the Ottoman Fortress, beside the excavated ruins of the Egyptian Governor's residence, that are located in the northwestern section of the fortress. Marker is in this post office
The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
2. The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker
Close-up view of the English text on the historical marker.
area: Rosh Ha'ayin, Central District 48800, Israel.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tel Afeq - Antipatris (within shouting distance of this marker); The Roman Cardo (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
Regarding The Egyptian Governor's Residence. In the December of 2009 edition of the Jewish Magazine it states that, "Tel Afek is one of the most important biblical places in Israel" (see link #2). As if to help prove the point, in the BibleWalks.com website states that the city of Tel AfeqIt, "was located on the strategic main highway - the way of the Sea or King's highway (Numbers 21, 22: 'Let me pass through thy land... we will go along by the king's high way, until we be past thy borders'). (see link #4)

This strategic point on the king's high way was extremely important to the Egyptians during their occupation of Canaan, during the Late Bronze Age. So much so that the Egyptians established a post here to guard the strategic roadway. It served to protect this important trade route for commerce between Egypt to the south and Syria to the north, and it watched over this important military route used by numerous Egyptian armies in their military campaigns in Canaan and in the territories to the north.

The Governor's
The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
3. The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker
View of the historical marker in the foreground and the governor's residence in the background, with the southwestern corner of the Ottoman fortress in the distant background.
Residence not only provides archaeological proof of the importance of this site to the Egyptians, but the written record also provides verification of this site's importance. According to the BibleWalks.com website, " The city is referenced in several Egyptian sources, starting in the 19th C Egyptian (12th Dynasty) enemy-curse clay tablets as "Aphkm". The city is one of the cities that were conquered by Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose III , just before the famous battle near Megiddo (1468 BC), which resulted in the Egyptian conquest of Canaan for 350 years. The Egyptians had to subdue some mutinies, such as in 1431 and 1429 by Amenhotep II, who listed Aphek among the cities he passed through."
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Yarkon Park. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on April 14, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Archaeology in Israel: Tel Afek. This is a link to related information provided by the Jewish Magazine. (Submitted on April 14, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Aphek, Antipatris. This is a link to information provided by BiblePlaces.com. (Submitted on April 14, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.)
The Egyptian Governor's Residence image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
4. The Egyptian Governor's Residence
View of the northern walls of the governor's residence in the foreground, and the Ottoman fortress in the background.
 

4. Afek in the Sharon (Antipatris). This is a link to information provided by BibleWalks.com. (Submitted on April 15, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. AnthropologySettlements & Settlers
 
The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
5. The Egyptian Governor's Residence Marker
View of the eastern side of the governor's residence, and the interior of the Ottoman fortress.
The Egyptian Governor's Residence image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, March 9, 2013
6. The Egyptian Governor's Residence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 14, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 469 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 15, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
Paid Advertisement