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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pultneyville in Wayne County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wreck of the St.Peter

National Register of Historic Places

 
 
Wreck of the <i>St. Peter</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, March 24, 2013
1. Wreck of the St. Peter Marker
Inscription.
Lost in a Storm
The St. Peter left Oswego carrying a full load of coal, headed for the safety of the Welland Canal when a storm struck her with 70 mph winds. Unable to reach the canal, the ship was turned back east to run before the wind, but the crew’s fight during 12 long hours of darkness, 20-foot high seas, gale-force winds, and freezing sleet was in vain. The ship, crew, and the Captain's wife were lost. The Captain was rescued by a boat from the local Lifesaving Service.

Three-masted Schooner
The St. Peter was a wooden hulled, schooner with three masts, built in 1873 by Edwards in Toledo, Ohio. She was 136' long, 26' wide, and 12’ deep, with a gross weight of 290 tons. She was lost 5 miles NW of Sodus, NY on October ,27, 1898. Eight people were lost, including the crew and the Captain's wife.

St. Peter Afloat
The historic photo below shows the St. Peter being towed into harbor by a tug. After she sank, the masts still protruded from the water, but were later dropped to prevent hazards to navigation. The St. Peter, a 136-foot, three-masted schooner rests upright and intact in 117 feet of water. A good portion of her remains were recovered in 1971 and now form the basis of a museum at the Pultneyville Historical Society. The Wreck
Entrance to B. Foreman Park as seen driving West on Lake Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, March 24, 2013
2. Entrance to B. Foreman Park as seen driving West on Lake Rd.
has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Lifesavers from Sodus Point made it to within a mile of the ship before she sank. They were able to rescue only one.
Ships like the St. Peter were employed to carry coal and other bulk items between Great Lakes ports. The upright deck of the St. Peter is shown in the photo above, and a diver floats in front of her bow, right.

Dive Site Information
Location: East of Pultneyville, NY
Access: Boat Only
Depth: 117 feet
Visibility: 20 to 100 feet. Average 45 feet.
Temperature: 40 to 73 degrees F.
Skill Level: Advanced open water diver.
Bottom: Flat and silty.
Hazards: Lake Ontario weather is unpredictable and can change very rapidly from good to severe. Weather conditions and unexpected weather changes should be a constant consideration. Strong currents may be present if seas are running 3 feet or higher.
 
Erected by Seaway Trail Inc.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Great Lakes Seaway Trail National Scenic Byway marker series.
 
Location. 43° 16.876′ N, 77° 10.172′ W. Marker is in Pultneyville, New York, in Wayne County. Marker can be reached from Foreman Park 0.1 miles north of Lake Road
Entrance to B. Foreman Park as seen driving East on Lake Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, March 24, 2013
3. Entrance to B. Foreman Park as seen driving East on Lake Rd.
. Touch for map. Marker is within B. Foreman Park. It is just off the northwest corner of the parking lot. It is one of 3 markers clustered together. Marker is in this post office area: Pultneyville NY 14538, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (here, next to this marker); Underground Railroad Terminus (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); First White Men (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Battle of Pultneyville (approx. 0.7 miles away); From the Nearby Ravine (approx. 0.7 miles away); Site of Union Church (approx. 0.9 miles away); 100 Years of Dramatics (approx. 0.9 miles away); Indian Trail (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pultneyville.
 
Categories. DisastersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 30, 2013, by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. This page has been viewed 318 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 30, 2013, by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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