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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winnabow in Brunswick County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Anderson

One Shovelful at a Time

 

—Confederate Lifeline —

 
Fort Anderson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 15, 2008
1. Fort Anderson Marker
Inscription. In 1861–1862, Col. William Lamb and Maj. John Hedrick constructed Fort Anderson, one of several Confederate strongholds that protected Wilmington, a major blockade-running port. They enlarged Fort St. Philip (for St. Philip’s Anglican Church on your right), an earthen wall with gun emplacements that extended from the ruin to the Cape Fear River and renamed it Fort Anderson. Although Lamb had no engineering experience, he applied to the building of fortifications what engineers had learned during the Crimean War (1854–1856). In July 1862, he assumed command of Fort Fisher downstream and transformed it into the world’s largest earthwork. There, as here at Fort Anderson, slaves and Indians moved the dirt and sand one shovelful at a time. Closer to the river here, you can see the massive artillery emplacements that mounted nine seacoast cannons, while movable field artillery pieces were positioned in this area. Large underground chambers sheltered the garrison and the volatile black powder supply during bombardments.

In January and February 1865, when the Federals captured Fort Fisher and Wilmington to cut the Confederate supply line to Virginia, Confederate forces under Gen. Johnson Hagood retreated here from Fort Fisher. The Federals soon followed and found Gen. Robert F. Hoke’s Confederates entrenched from the
Detail of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 15, 2008
2. Detail of Marker
fort west to Orton Pond. For three days, Union Gen. Jacob D. Cox demonstrated in front of the fort and Hoke, had gunboats in the river shell the fort, and marched a flanking force around Orton Pond to attack the fort’s unprotected rear. During the early morning of February 19, as the attack began, Hagood evacuated Fort Anderson, and the Federals immediately occupied it.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 34° 2.367′ N, 77° 56.778′ W. Marker is near Winnabow, North Carolina, in Brunswick County. Marker is on St. Philips Road east of Plantation Road. Touch for map. It is outside of the Brunswick Town Historic Site visitors center, facing the earthworks. Marker is in this post office area: Winnabow NC 28479, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Fort Anderson (within shouting distance of this marker); Brunswick Town State Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel Maurice Moore (within shouting distance of this marker); John LaPierre
Detail of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 15, 2008
3. Detail of Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Russelborough (approx. 0.4 miles away); Russellborough (approx. 0.4 miles away); Orton Plantation (approx. 1.7 miles away); St. Philips Church (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winnabow.
 
More about this marker. A drawing of a "Fort Anderson Battle scene, by Stephen McCall" is at the lower right; followed by a map of Cape Fear showing Roads to Wilmington, Fort Anderson and Fisher, and Hoke’s positions; and a portrait of "Pvt. James Croom, Co. B, 1st Battalion, N.C. Heavy Artillery stationed at Fort Anderson."

In the center of the marker are portraits of Gen. Johnson Hagood and Col. William Lamb. The lower right has a period map of “Fort Anderson, showing line of attack by gunboats.”
 
Regarding Fort Anderson. Fort Anderson protected the Confederacy’s most important blockade-running seaport, Wilmington, 13 miles upriver from the fort.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Anderson: The Battle for Wilmington. Book by Chris E. Fonvielle on Amazon.com with the “Search Inside” feature. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 

2. Brunswick Town / Fort Anderson State Historic Site
Map of Present-Day Historic Site image. Click for full size.
4. Map of Present-Day Historic Site
An 11" x 14" copy of this map is available at at the visitor’s center. Click on this image to enlarge.
. (Submitted on March 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Archaeologists Prepare to excavate Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson. News article discussing recent excavation projects at the fort. (Submitted on March 31, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Marker and Some of the Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 15, 2008
5. Marker and Some of the Earthworks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 23, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,695 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 23, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on August 12, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5. submitted on March 23, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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