Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Ulm in Brown County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Kiesling House

(1861)

 
 
Kiesling House Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
1. Kiesling House Marker
Inscription. The Kiesling House is one of the three downtown buildings in New Ulm to survive the Dakota War of 1862. Frederick W. Kiesling, blacksmith and ferrier, had built the modest frame house ($125) the year before the outbreak of the war. In August of 1862 New Ulm defenders marked the Kiesling House for torching in the event that the Dakota attack broke through the downtown barriers. The downtown defenses held even though the city lost about 75% of the buildings to fire.

In 1970 the family-owned residence was purchased for preservation and donated to the City of New Ulm by Dr/Mrs T.R. Fritsche, Mr/Mrs T.H. Schonlau, and Mr/Mrs Henry Somsen. Restoration monies came from donations as well as state and federal grants. Set in a small park-like square, the Kiesling House is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places (1972). For five years it housed the offices of the New Ulm Area Chamber of Commerce, and presently is home to the Council for the Arts New Ulm (CANU).

Marker Erected in 2002
To Commemorate the 140th Anniversary of the Dakota War
by the City of New Ulm and the Junior Pioneers
of New Ulm and Vicinity.

 
Erected 2002 by the City of New Ulm and and the Junior Pioneers of New Ulm and Vicinity.
 
Location.
Kiesling House Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
2. Kiesling House Marker
east side of marker with duplicate text
44° 18.96′ N, 94° 27.674′ W. Marker is in New Ulm, Minnesota, in Brown County. Marker is on North Minnesota Street south of 3rd North Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 220 North Minnesota Street, New Ulm MN 56073, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Barricading New Ulm (a few steps from this marker); Grand Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); Buenger Store (within shouting distance of this marker); Pioneer Founders of New Ulm (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); German–Bohemian Immigrants Monument (about 500 feet away); Crone Store (about 500 feet away); Dacotah House (about 500 feet away); Jacob Nix Platz (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Ulm.
 
Also see . . .
1. New Ulm History. Kiesling House video. (Submitted on May 25, 2013.) 

2. The Kiesling House. (Submitted on May 25, 2013.)
3. Minnesota Historical Society. Kiesling, Frederick W. House property details. (Submitted on May 25, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWars, US Indian
 
Kiesling House Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
3. Kiesling House Marker
Kiesling House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
4. Kiesling House and Marker
Kiesling House image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
5. Kiesling House
National Register of Historic Places #72000674
Nearby Biography and Life Size Standup image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
6. Nearby Biography and Life Size Standup
Friedrich Kiesling Biography image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
7. Friedrich Kiesling Biography
Kiesling was born in Kiffern, Saxony, Germany, on July 15, 1829. As a young man, Friedrich worked as a blacksmith, a trade that he later practiced in this city for thirty years. In November 1856, he married Caroline Riehle. Four years later, they emigrated to America, coming directly to New Ulm where two brothers, August and Herman, had already settled. In 1861, with a growing family, Kiesling built this house.
On August 18, 1862, after reports of attacks by Dakota Indians filtered into New Ulm, local citizens erected a barricade around the central part of the city, between Third North and Center Street. The breastworks ran behind Kiesling's house, one of only two intact downtown buildings that remain from the time of the U.S.-Dakota Conflict.
Friedrich lived here until around 1897, when he moved to Winthrop to reside with his children. He died in 1912.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 25, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 490 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 25, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
Paid Advertisement