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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia Heights in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew

3324 Sherman Avenue, NW, Apartment 1

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington DC —

 
Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
1. Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew Marker
Inscription. Dr. Charles R. Drew (1904-1950), renowned for his blood plasma research, was associated with Howard University College of Medicine during most of his career. In 1941 Drew joined a national effort to set up a blood banking process but left because U.S. Government policy segregated blood by race of donor. Drew later died after an automobile accident in North Carolina. The story that he died because a white hospital refused to treat him is a myth, although this tragedy did befall others during the era of segregated health care. Drew and his family lived here in the 1940s.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, D.C. African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 55.89′ N, 77° 1.605′ W. Marker is in Columbia Heights, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Sherman Avenue. Touch for map. The marker is on the fence in front of 3324 Sherman Ave NW Washington, DC 20010. 3324 is the right hand side of a duplex building. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nob Hill (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line);
Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
2. Charles R. Drew and Lenore Robbins Drew Marker
The Next Wave (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Modern Shopper (approx. 0.2 miles away); From Beer Garden to Park View (approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing); "Treat Me Refined" (approx. ¼ mile away); Urban Oasis (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Former Engine Co 24 of the District of Columbia Fire Department (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mr. Lincoln’s Ride (approx. 0.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Patent For Preserving Blood Issued November 10, 1942. USPTO, Press Release, 01-52 (Submitted on May 27, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Medicine
 
Categories. African AmericansScience & Medicine
 
3322 and 3324 Sherman Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
3. 3322 and 3324 Sherman Avenue
3324 Sherman Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 25, 2013
4. 3324 Sherman Avenue
Charles R. Drew image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
5. Charles R. Drew
Charles Richard Drew (June 3,1904 –April 1,1950) was an African-American physician, surgeon, and medical researcher. He researched in the field of blood transfusions, developing improved techniques for blood storage, and applied his expert knowledge to developing large-scale blood banks early in World War II. This allowed medics to save thousands of lives of the Allied forces. The research and development aspect of his blood storage work is disputed. As the most prominent African-American in the field, Drew protested against the practice of racial segregation in the donation of blood, as it lacked scientific foundation, an action which cost him his job. In 1943, Drew's distinction in his profession was recognized when he became the first black surgeon selected to serve as an examiner on the American Board of Surgery. -- Wikipedia (accessed 5/27/2013)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 27, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 551 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 27, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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