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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ninth Army Corps

Crook's Brigade, Kanawha Division

 
 
Crook's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
1. Crook's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Ninth Army Corps.
Crook's Brigade, Kanawha Division,

Col. George Crook, 36th Ohio Infantry, Commanding.
Organization.
11th, 28th and 36th Ohio Infantry,
Simmonds' (Ky.) Battery.
September 16-17, 1862.

On the evening of September 16th Crook's Brigade formed line on the ridge east o the Antietam, and north of the Burnside Bridge.

On the morning of the 17th, preceded by the 11th Connecticut of Harland's Brigade, as skirmishers, it attempted to carry the bridge but failed. About 2 p.m. five companies of the 28th Ohio crossed the stream at a ford 250 yards north of the bridge and advanced to the rising ground east of the Sharpsburg road. The remainder of the brigade crossed the bridge and moved up the road about 350 yards, when the united brigade advanced over the high ground west of the road and supported the left of Willcox's Division. It assisted in checking A.P. Hill's advance but, the left of the line having been turned, it was obliged to withdraw to the cover of the ridge south and east of this line. This tablet marks the center of the advance position of the brigade.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 60.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers
Ninth Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Ninth Army Corps Marker
marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.195′ N, 77° 44.353′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Branch Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop 10, the Final Attack, of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Ninth Army Corps ( here, next to this marker); D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command ( a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named D.R. Jones' Division, Longstreet's Command ( a few steps from this marker); Longstreet's Command ( a few steps from this marker); "It Is A.P. Hill" ( a few steps from this marker); 28th Ohio Volunteer Infantry ( a few steps from this marker); Brown’s (Wise), Virginia Battery ( a few steps from this marker); The Advance Was Made With the Utmost Enthusiasm ( within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division, IX Corps. The
Federal Tablet Cluster and the 28th Ohio Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Federal Tablet Cluster and the 28th Ohio Monument
From left to right are the Ninth Army Corps Tablet (Number 70), Continuation Tablet, Crook's Brigade Tablet (Number 60), and the 28th Ohio Monument.
Brigade Ohio troops originally operated in western Virginia. (Submitted on March 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. General George Crook. General Crook served in both Eastern and Western Theaters of war with distinction during the war. He commanded a corps in the 1864 Shenandoah Valley Campaign. After the war he had a successful career on the frontier, earning the name Nantan Lupan (Grey Fox) from none other than the great Apache chief Geronimo. (Submitted on March 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Ninth Army Corps Marker<br>Third From the Left image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Ninth Army Corps Marker
Third From the Left
Major General George Crook (1830-1890) image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Major General George Crook (1830-1890)
On September 12, 1862, Crook assumed command of the 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division which had been attached to the IX Corps.
Crook's Brigade Advances image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 9, 2008
6. Crook's Brigade Advances
Looking east from the tablet location, Crook's Brigade advanced over the ground around and to the south of the Otto Farm and orchard. The advance brought lead elements of the brigade onto the high ground where the tablet stands today.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 832 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 6, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on March 31, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 6, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on March 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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