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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Danville, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Bloody Monday

 
 
Bloody Monday Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 15, 2013
1. Bloody Monday Marker
Inscription. In the spring of 1963 local African American ministers and other leaders organized the Danville Movement to combat widespread racial segregation and discrimination. On 10 June, two demonstrations occurred. Police clubbed and fire-hosed the marchers, injuring at least 47 and arresting 60. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., offered protesters his "full, personal support" when he arrived in Danville on 11 July. The nonviolent protests, which became known as "Bloody Monday," gained national news coverage before the 28 Aug. March on Washington co-led by the Rev. Dr. King. Both events swelled sentiment in favor of civil rights legislation.
 
Erected 2007 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number Q 5m.)
 
Location. 36° 35.207′ N, 79° 23.505′ W. Marker is in Danville, Virginia. Marker is on Patton Street east of South Union Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Danville VA 24541, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Danville System (within shouting distance of this marker); Loyal Baptist Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Prison Number 6
Bloody Monday Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, June 15, 2013
2. Bloody Monday Marker
(about 500 feet away); Confederate Prison No. 6 (about 500 feet away); Danville Tobacco Warehouse and Residential District (about 800 feet away); The Worsham Street Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away); High Street Baptist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); 750 Main Street (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Danville.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 16, 2013, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 721 times since then and 187 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 16, 2013, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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