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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vail in Pima County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Cienega Bridge

Built 1921

 
 
Cienega Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
1. Cienega Bridge Marker
Inscription.
Has been listed in the
National Register
of Historic Places

By the United States
Department of the Interior
September 30, 1988

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Old Spanish National Trail marker series.
 
Location. 32° 1.164′ N, 110° 38.791′ W. Marker is in Vail, Arizona, in Pima County. Marker is on East Marsh Station Road 3.3 miles east of Interstate 10, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Take exit 281 from Interstate 10 and turn right on North Frontage Road. Follow Frontage Road (Marsh Station Road) 3.3 miles to bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Vail AZ 85641, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Vail Sonoita Highway (was approx. 2.8 miles away but has been reported missing. ); The CCC Worker (approx. 3 miles away); Colossal Cave Mountain Park (approx. 3.1 miles away); Desert Homes (approx. 10.9 miles away); Home for Saguaros (approx. 12.3 miles away); Where Have All the Saguaros Gone? (approx. 13.4 miles away).
 
Regarding Cienega Bridge. From: Drive the Old Spanish Trail Auto Route.

Leaving Benson, one is forced to take
Cienega Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
2. Cienega Bridge Marker
Interstate 8 west. But don’t despair, ahead lies one of the best sections of the Old Spanish Trail/US 80 in Arizona. Exit at Marsh Station Road (Ex. 289) to experience an up-and-down roller coaster ride along a vintage two-lane highway. (Watch out, there are no shoulders.)

The highlight of the road is the spectacular Cienega Creek Bridge. Constructed in 1921, the three-hinged, open-spandrel concrete arch bridge soars above tiny Cienega Creek, and at its south end gives passage to the Southern Pacific Railroad. Stopping on the northwest embankment provides an interesting photo opportunity. Every 20 minutes or so the approaching train appears as if it is going to smash into the bridge. Fortunately, this has never happened, but the bridge did lose its original decorative railing due to safety codes several years ago.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRoads & Vehicles
 
Cienega Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
3. Cienega Bridge Marker
Cienega Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
4. Cienega Bridge
Cienega Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
5. Cienega Bridge Marker
Cienega Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
6. Cienega Bridge Marker
Cienega Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 15, 2013
7. Cienega Bridge
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 16, 2013, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 482 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 16, 2013, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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