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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Monroe in Overton County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Camp Myers

Confederate Induction Center

 
 
Camp Myers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 22, 2013
1. Camp Myers Marker
Inscription. Camp Myers, a Confederate training camp established early in 1861 in Overton County together with Camp Zollicoffer, was located nearby and named for Calvin Myers, a Mexican War veteran. After Tennessee seceded in June 1861, Camp Myers was used to train men recruited locally. It also became a permanent military post to help secure the border against Federal raids from Kentucky and to suppress the activities of Unionist residents of Overton and Fentress counties. Troops from Camp Myers fought several skirmishes with Unionist home guards and guerrillas. Sgt. Fayette McDowell wrote his family about the many activities in a typical camp day, observing, “You know I am busy. But I stand it very well. I suffer for sleep sometimes.”

Gov. Isham G. Harris appointed Col. Stokely H. Huddleston of Livingston as a recruiter for Camp Myers. Col. Sidney S. Stanton also raised and trained troops here. He recruited several companies for the 25th Tennessee Infantry, which he then led until he was mortally wounded during the Atlanta campaign in 1864. The regiment fought at Fishing Creek, in northern Mississippi during the Shiloh campaign, and at Perryville, Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga. In 1864, it was transferred east to Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and ended the war in Virginia, surrendering at Appomattox Court House
Camp Myers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 22, 2013
2. Camp Myers Marker
on April 9, 1865.

Col. John M. Hughs, also of the 25th Tennessee Infantry, operated behind Union lines during the winter of 1863-1864. He led a 300-man Confederate guerrilla unit into Kentucky from here to raid Federal installations.

(Inscription under the photo in the center of the marker)
Washing clothes in camp, Harper’s Weekly, July 20, 1861.

(Inscription under the photo at the bottom right of the marker)
Confederate recruits drilling in camp, Harper’s Weekly, Nov. 9, 1861
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 26.934′ N, 85° 12.816′ W. Marker is near Monroe, Tennessee, in Overton County. Marker is on Byrdstown Highway (SR111) north of Beaty Swamp Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Monroe TN 38573, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. "Tennessee Lead" (approx. 6.4 miles away); Specialist 4 James T. Davis (approx. 7.6 miles away); Overton County Courthouse (approx. 7.6 miles away); a different
Camp Myers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 22, 2013
3. Camp Myers Marker
marker also named Overton County Courthouse (approx. 7.6 miles away); Cordell Hull (approx. 8.7 miles away); Heart of Controversy (approx. 9.6 miles away); Camp Zollicoffer (approx. 10 miles away); Fentress County / Pickett County (approx. 13.7 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Camp Myers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 22, 2013
4. Camp Myers Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 2, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 355 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 2, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page.
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