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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Montevideo in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Camp Release

 
 
Camp Release Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
1. Camp Release Marker
Inscription. On September 26, 1862, 91 whites and about 150 mixed-blood captives, some of whom had been prisoners of the Dakota Indians for more than a month, were returned to Colonel Henry H. Sibley's military camp, later joyfully known as Camp Release. In the next few days, additional captives were freed, bringing the total to 107 whites and 162 mixed-bloods – 269 in all.

When the 1862 U.S.-Dakota conflict moved into its final weeks in mid-September, attention on both sides had focused on the captives, mostly women and children, held by the Dakota. Sibley, heading a largely volunteer army, demanded that the captives be released before peace negotiations could begin. But the Dakota warriors led by Little Crow moved up the Minnesota River Valley, still holding their prisoners.

Many Dakota who had not supported the war took great risks to help keep the captives alive. By late September, Dakota peace factions led by Wabasha, Taopi, Red Iron, Mazomani, Standing Buffalo, and others were camped only half a mile from the war faction near the mouth of the Chippewa River. While Little Crow's men were fighting the battle of Wood Lake, the peace supporters took control of the captives, expecting to have to fight the returning war party if it were victorious against Sibley's army. But Little Crow's men did not win at Wood Lake. The
Camp Release Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
2. Camp Release Marker
war leaders and many of their followers fled Minnesota, and the Dakota peace group sent a message to Sibley to arrange the prisoner release three days later. Many of the peace faction who surrendered to Sibley's army at Camp Release were among the Dakota exiled from Minnesota the following year.

seal of Minnesota Department of Transportation
seal of The Minnesota Historical Society, Instituted 1849

Erected by the Minnesota Historical Society
1989

 
Erected 1989 by the Minnesota Historical Society. (Marker Number LP-CAM-003.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 44° 56.004′ N, 95° 44.876′ W. Marker is near Montevideo, Minnesota, in Lac qui Parle County. Marker can be reached from 445th Avenue south of U.S. 212, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Montevideo MN 56265, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Release State Monument (a few steps from this marker); Tried and Sentenced (within shouting distance of this marker); Maza sa Protected His Village
Camp Release Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
3. Camp Release Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Captives Released (within shouting distance of this marker); School Bell (approx. 13.4 miles away); Henry Hill 1829-1879 (approx. 13.4 miles away); Ancient Exposed Rocks (approx. 13.4 miles away); World's Oldest Rock (approx. 13.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montevideo.
 
Also see . . .
1. Surrender at Camp Release. Wikipedia entry. "After the Battle of Wood Lake, Colonel Henry Hastings Sibley had considered pursuing the retreating Sioux, but he realized he did not have the resources for a vigorous pursuit. Moreover, he feared that doing so would have inspired the Indians to murder the settlers they were holding captive." (Submitted on October 7, 2013.) 

2. Dakota War Captives. (Submitted on October 7, 2013.)
 
Categories. PeaceWars, US Indian
 
Marker and Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
4. Marker and Camp Release State Monument
north side of marker with duplicate text
Historic name: Camp Release State Memorial Wayside
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 457 times since then and 71 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 7, 2013, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.
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