Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Jeffrey City in Fremont County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Split Rock

 
 
Split Rock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2010
1. Split Rock Marker
Inscription. Split Rock was a relay station during the turbulent 18 month life of the Pony Express. The Express operated at a gallop, speeding mail across the West in only 10 days. However, because of the "talking wire," its days were numbered. The telegraph reached California by October 1861, ending a unique American experiment.

How it was done
Mail relay stations were set up 10 to 15 miles apart, each with two to four men and extra horses. About 500 of the hardiest western ponies were bought at prices up to $200 each. Most important of all, 80 riders were recruited from the most daring, determined and toughest "wiry young fellows" in the West.

Lightly equipped and armed, each rider rode about 70 miles round trip, exchanging horses at three relay stations. Over his saddle he carried the mochila, a leather cover with four mail pouches. Postage for a single letter varied from $1 to $5. Each rider rode at top speed to his relay stations where the precious mochila was placed on a waiting horse and he was off again in about two minutes. Day and night, good weather and bad, winter and summer, the "Pony" never stopped, averaging 10 to 15 miles an hour across the West.

The Pony's echo
Completion of the transcontinental telegraph line on October 24, 1861 doomed the Pony Express. During
Split Rock Meadows image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 28, 2013
2. Split Rock Meadows
View from near marker
its short life, the Express attracted world-wide attention that has not faded with time. Russell, Majors, Waddell and Company lost over $1 million on this venture. Nevertheless, the Pony Express stands tall as an outstanding example of American enterprise, endurance, courage and determination.
 
Erected by Bureau of Land Management.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Trail, the Mormon Pioneer Trail, the Oregon Trail, and the Pony Express National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 42° 27.253′ N, 107° 32.743′ W. Marker is near Jeffrey City, Wyoming, in Fremont County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 287 one mile west of California Emigrant Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located at a BLM interpretive pullout on the north side of US Route 287 approx. 16 miles east of Jeffrey City and approx. 8 miles northwest of State Route 220. Marker is in this post office area: Jeffrey City WY 82310, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pony Express (here, next to this marker); Split Rock Meadows (here, next to this marker); Trails to Opportunity (within shouting distance of this marker); Wild Horses
Split Rock Meadows image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2010
3. Split Rock Meadows
View from US 287 west of marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Split Rock (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Split Rock (approx. 3.2 miles away); Muddy Gap (approx. 8.2 miles away).
 
Categories. CommunicationsRoads & Vehicles
 
Split Rock viewed from US 287 west of markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 31, 2010
4. Split Rock viewed from US 287 west of markers
Split Rock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, May 29, 2016
5. Split Rock Marker
This marker in in the center. Split Rock is in the background.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 6, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 22, 2013, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 383 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 22, 2013, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   3, 4. submitted on December 23, 2012, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   5. submitted on July 5, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos with wide-view of marker and surroundings. • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement