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Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

General Albert Sidney Johnston

 
 
Johnston Mortuary Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Nick Kurtz
1. Johnston Mortuary Monument Marker
Inscription.
C. S.
General Albert Sidney Johnston
Commanding
the Confederate Army,
Was mortally wounded
at 2.30 P.M.,April 6, 1862,
Died in ravine, 50 yards
south-east, at
2:45 P.M.

 
Location. 35° 7.812′ N, 88° 19.772′ W. Marker is in Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on Hamburg-Savannah Road. Touch for map. Located near Spain's Field at stop 12, "the Death of Johnston," on the tour road in Shiloh National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Death of General Johnston (within shouting distance of this marker); 9th Illinois Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named General Albert Sidney Johnston (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named 9th Illinois Infantry (about 300 feet away); Battery A, 1st Illinois Artillery (about 400 feet away); 12th Illinois Infantry (about 500 feet away); 32nd Illinois Infantry (about 500 feet away); Robertson's Alabama Battery (was about 600 feet away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shiloh.
 
Also see . . .
1. National Park Service
General Albert Sidney Johnston Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
2. General Albert Sidney Johnston Monument
The monument features an upright 4.2-inch (or 30-pdr) Parrott Rifle. Visible on the right rimbase is the foundry number 666, matching to registry number 183. The rifle was produced in 1863 by West Point Foundry, and weighed 4,240 pounds.
. In all of American history, he is the highest-ranking American military officer ever to be killed in action. (Submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. A.S. Johnston. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Johnston was the commander of the U.S. Army Department of the Pacific in California. (Submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. CSA Ranks. "General" is a rank above "Lt.General". CSA still all grades of general had the insignia of three stars (the middle being slightly larger) in an open top wreath pattern. (Submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Johnson's Mortal Wounding and Death
Senator Isham G. Harris, who was Governor of Tennessee in 1862 and was serving as Volunteer Aid on the staff of General Johnston at Shiloh, visited this field in April, 1896 for the express purpose of fixing the place where General Johnston fell. After a careful examination of the ground over which the advance was made, he came to the place now marked by the monument and said: "General Johnston was following the advance of Bowen's brigade; he had sent all the members of his staff to other parts of the field with orders. I was the last to leave him, with an order to
Johnston Marker ( Killed here ) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1991
3. Johnston Marker ( Killed here )
put Statham's brigade in motion across the Peach Orchard. When I returned General Johnston was alone, sitting on his horse near a large oak tree (where the monument now stands). I saw him reel in the saddle and rode to his side and asked: 'General, are you hurt?' He replied: 'Yes, I fear seriously.' I supported him in the saddle and guided the two horses to the ravine in rear; then lifted him from the horse and placed him on the ground. He was unconscious and died in a few minutes, at 2.30 p.m." Senator Harris fixed the spot where this tablet stands as the place where General Johnston died.
    — Submitted April 9, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Gen. A.S.Johnston Tree image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1991
4. Gen. A.S.Johnston Tree
This tree stump, which is no longer standing, is commonly known as the "Johnston Tree." The oft told story is Johnston died under the tree. In reality, he died in the ravine behind the tree. In the early days of the park, a sign was nailed to the tree indicating the place of Johnston's death. From there, some implied the tree itself was the site of the General's last moments.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,521 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 22, 2008, by Nick Kurtz of Littleton, Colorado.   2. submitted on August 2, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on April 8, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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