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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Watervliet in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Saint Patrick's Church Bell

 
 
Saint Patrick's Church Bell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 4, 2013
1. Saint Patrick's Church Bell Marker
Inscription. The most obvious music associated with any church is the sweet and dignified tolling of the church bell. Pictured above is George E. Hipwod, President of the Holy Names Society who presented the bell for placement in the new church.

The bell was manufactured by the Meneely Bell foundry of Watervliet for the former Saint Patrick's Church in 1906. They were the master bell maker at the time. Perched in the tower at an altitude of 125 feet, the bell could be heard throughout the city. Its sweet toned sound is in the key of Bb international pitch i.e.. the bass clef. The instrument weighing 11,000 pounds mounted is made of the purest metal, 78% copper and 22% tin. The bell, a gift from the Holy Name Society cost $3500. It was made and delivered within 60 days of the receipt of the order.

In 1890 the former St. Patrick's church located on the southwest corner of 23rd Street and 4th Avenue become totally inadequate for the number of parishioners. As a result, a new church was built on the north side of Ninteenth Street between 5th and 6th Avenue, a facsimile of the church at Lourdes, France

Heartfelt gratitude to the Nigro Companies and the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish for donating the Saint Patrick's Bell to the Watervliet Historical Society. A special thanks also to Streck's Inc., Bonded Concrete, the City of
Saint Patrick's Church Bell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 4, 2013
2. Saint Patrick's Church Bell Marker
The marker is to the right of the bell.
Watervliet, Tom Allison and Water Charitable Foundation for their assistance in making this display possible.
 
Erected 2013 by Watervliet Historical Society.
 
Location. 42° 43.57′ N, 73° 42.062′ W. Marker is in Watervliet, New York, in Albany County. Marker is at the intersection of 1st Avenue and 15th Street on 1st Avenue. Touch for map. The marker is next to the large bell at the front steps at the Watervliet Historical Society. The society is located at the Corner of 1st Avenue and 15th Street, just behind the Watervliet Public Library. Marker is in this post office area: Watervliet NY 12189, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civil War Parrott Rifle (within shouting distance of this marker); City of Watervliet (within shouting distance of this marker); Meneely Foundry (within shouting distance of this marker); Peter J. Dalessandro (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); U.S. Army 3 Inch M5 Antitank Gun (about 600 feet away); The Nalle Rescue (about 700 feet away); Uncle Sam (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mayor James F. Cavanaugh (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Watervliet.
 
Also see . . .  The Watervliet Historical Society.
Saint Patrick's Church Bell Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Watervliet Historical Society
3. Saint Patrick's Church Bell Marker Detail
Pictured above is George E. Hipwod, President of the Holy Names Society, who presented the bell for placement in St. Patrick's.
(Submitted on December 7, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional keywords. St Patrick's Watervliet church demolition
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Man-Made Features
 
Saint Patrick's Church Bell image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 4, 2013
4. Saint Patrick's Church Bell
The bell is on display in front of the Watervliet Historical Society.
Saint Patrick's Church Bell - Lit at Night image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 5, 2013
5. Saint Patrick's Church Bell - Lit at Night
Saint Patrick's Church Bell image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 4, 2013
6. Saint Patrick's Church Bell
This photo shows the embossed text on the bell, which says,
"Meneely & Co..West Troy, N.Y. 1906.

ST. PARTICK.

The writing is not an inscription, as lettering inscribed could induce a crack in the bell, thus bells are generally made with raised text.
Saint Patrick's Church Bell image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 4, 2013
7. Saint Patrick's Church Bell
The embossed text on this side of the bell reads as follows:

In Nomine Jesu Onme Genu

Flectatur Coelestium

Terrestrium Et Infernorum.

Presented to

St. Patrick’s Church

West Troy, Watervliet, N.Y.

By the

Holy Name Society.-

George E. Hipwood, Prest.,

Joseph T. Cavanaugh,

Francis Powers,

Secretaries.

Thomas F. McLoughlin, Treas.

Rev. W.F. Sheehan, M. R.. Pastor.

The Latin portion translates to "That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth", from Philippians 2:10
Saint Patrick's Church Demolition - 2013 image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 16, 2013
8. Saint Patrick's Church Demolition - 2013
A pair of photos from May 2013 shows the regrettable progress in the demolition of St. Patrick's church in Watervliet. The tower that held the bell was the last section of the edifice to be torn down. Later the adjacent parochial school associated with the church, along with a handful of residential buildings on the block, were leveled to make way for a new Price Chopper grocery store that was scheduled to be built on the site in 2014.
Saint Patrick's Church image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, circa June 2012
9. Saint Patrick's Church
The former Saint Patrick's Church in Watervliet
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 7, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 510 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on December 7, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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