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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fourth United States Infantry

 
 
Fourth U.S. Infantry Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
1. Fourth U.S. Infantry Tablet
Inscription.
Fourth United States Infantry.

The Fourth United States Infantry, Captain Hiram Dryer commanding, crossing the Antietam between 2 and 3 p.m. of September 17, 1862, advanced to with in a few feet of this point; three companies under command of Lieut. C.H. Charlton were deployed as skirmishers and moving over the high ground in the direction of Sharpsburg became sharply engaged with those of the enemy. The skirmishers were withdrawn about sunset and shortly after, the regiment retired across the Antietam. This tablet marks the center of the advanced line.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 86.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 27.777′ N, 77° 44.108′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Richardson Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fifth Army Corps (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fifth Army Corps
Fourth United States Infantry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Fourth United States Infantry Marker
(about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Fifth Army Corps (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Fifth Army Corps (about 600 feet away); Twelfth United States Infantry (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Fifth Army Corps (about 700 feet away); V Corps, 2nd Division, 1st Brigade (about 700 feet away); Horse Batteries and Reserve Artillery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on April 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 4th U.S. Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, V Corps. In his official report, Dryer mentions having operational control of all the regulars on the west side of the Antietam. (Submitted on April 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Capt. Hiram Dryer (1822-1867). (Submitted on September 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
4th U.S. Infantry Tablet on Richardson Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
3. 4th U.S. Infantry Tablet on Richardson Avenue
The tablet overlooks the site of the Newcomer House, which stood on the north side of the Boonsboro Pike.
Fourth United States Infantry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Fourth United States Infantry Marker
Capt. Hiram Dryer (1822-1867) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. Capt. Hiram Dryer (1822-1867)
"In the great battle of September 17th, the Regular Division was held in reserve and in support of the reserve artillery until about two o'clock in the afternoon, when Capt. Hiram Dryer was ordered to cross the Antietam creek with the 2d and 10th, the 4th, 12th and 14th Infantry. These regiments supported Tidball's batteries, and about sundown advanced and easily drove back the enemy into the village of Sharpsburg. Captain Dryer did not feel authorized to go further without orders, and applied for permission to press his attack. It appears from official reports that General Pleasanton also advised an advance. General Sykes told the writer after the war that it was on this occasion that General Fitz John Porter reminded General McClellan that his corps was the last reserve of the last Army of the Republic. It is needless of course to speculate on what might have been, but this can be said, that the Regular Division was that day in its best condition. Captain Dryer rode into the rebel lines and saw that there were but two regiments and a battery left in the center. That night there was gnashing of teeth in the Regular camp." -- Regimental historian Col. Thomas M. Anderson
4th U.S. Infantry Under Fire image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
6. 4th U.S. Infantry Under Fire
Looking west from the tablet location. When the 4th U.S. reached the farm lane (which ran north to become the Sunken Road), it came under fire from Confederate artillery positioned on the high ground near the present day National Cemetery. The cemetery's walls are on the distant center of this photo. Additional artillery positioned on the high ground to the north of the Pike (right of photo) also engaged the regulars. This placed the regiment in a cross fire.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 775 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on September 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on April 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on September 30, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on April 13, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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